• US Cut Its CO2 Emissions by 7 Percent Last Year

    The world can be a thoroughly depressing place. It seems like bad news is all we ever get, like oil spills destroying wildlife, killer hurricanes, economic collapse, and terrorists with bombs in their underwear. However, bad news is not always so bad. It motivates us to act, to learn from our mistakes, and eventually become better for it. Good news does not teach us anything, except how much better good news feels than bad news. However, it offers a glimmer of hope, a reminder that hard work can actually show results. Yesterday, we received that good news from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), an independent federal statistics and analysis agency. They reported that the US achieved a record setting seven percent decline in CO2 emissions in 2009. >> Read the Full Article
  • Currents Influence Fish Stocks: More Cod in the Barents Sea

    The entire North Atlantic warmed up during the 1920s and 1930s. More fish appeared not only in the Barents Sea but also off Iceland and Greenland. This warm period reached its peak at the end of the thirties and lasted until roughly 1960, when the waters began turning colder again -- and fisheries resources declined once more. In recent years, the North Atlantic has shown signs of a new period of warming. >> Read the Full Article
  • How Cold Can It Go?

    Here we are in global warming but there are still places that can be outright cold. Antarctica, of course, comes to mind as well as Siberia. The lowest recorded air temperature on Earth was a measurement of −89.2C (-128.6 F) made at Vostok station, Antarctica, at 0245 UT on 21 July 1983. What could have caused it? What sort of freak weather pattern made it so frigid? >> Read the Full Article
  • Mount St. Helens' Aftermath

    A volcano erupts and the world seems to end. What happens afterwards? May 18 marks the 30th anniversary of the eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington state and scientists to this day use what's being learned there to challenge established thinking about how landscapes evolve and rebound. >> Read the Full Article
  • New State-by-State Wind Power Data Helps Build a Green Grid

    New wind resource maps and wind potential tables for the lower 48 states were recently released by AWS Truewind in collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This new data marks the first state-by-state comprehensive update of wind energy potential since 1993. Accurate information about the wind resources available in each state will help keep the momentum in wind energy development going strong in 2010. If state and federal policies need valid evidence of wind potential to promote this clean energy source, then that data has arrived. >> Read the Full Article
  • Warmer Arctic needs new rules to limit environmental damage

    A new, warmer Arctic cannot continue to operate under rules that assume it is ice-covered and essentially closed to fishing, resource exploration and development and shipping, WWF said as it launched a group of reports on protecting a newly accessible, highly vulnerable environment with profound significance for global climate, the global economy and global security. The International Governance and Regulation of the Marine Arctic reports were launched as Russian president Medvedev visits Norwegian capital Oslo for talks which include arctic issues and just before the Arctic Council meets in Greenland. >> Read the Full Article
  • EPA Confirms Climate IS Changing

    In another display of the sea change that has occurred at the US Environmental Protection Agency under the current administration, a new report was issued yesterday regarding indicators of climate change. The report, entitled "Climate Change Indicators in the United States," measures 24 separate indicators showing how climate change affects the health and environment of US citizens. >> Read the Full Article
  • Take ENN Reader Survey, Enter in a Chance to Win a Free iPad!!

    ENN is looking at ways we can improve our website to better serve you. Please take 5 minutes to complete a user survey to help us. The results of our user survey will help us see which parts of our current site are most valuable to you, and which ones you may find less useful. Going forward, we will keep what is working, and make some changes to incorporate new elements that people want. We appreciate that your time is very valuable, and are giving away an Apple iPad as a thank you to one lucky person who completes the survey. The lucky winner can use the iPad to check the news on ENN from any wi-Fi hotspot. It may also be useful for other tasks. The survey will run for a month, and the winner will be announced after the end of the survey period. To participate in the survey and to enter the iPad drawing, visit this link: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ENN

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  • Soil Production of C02 May Decline As World Warms

    Contradicting earlier studies showing that soil microbes will emit more carbon dioxide as global warming intensifies, new research suggests that these microbes become less efficient over time in a warmer environment and would actually emit less CO2. The research, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, could have important implications for calculating how much heat-trapping CO2 will accumulate in the atmosphere as temperatures rise. Researchers from the University of California, Irvine, as well as Colorado State and Yale universities, found that soil microbes, in the form of bacteria and fungi, rapidly exhale CO2 for a short period of time in a warmer environment. >> Read the Full Article
  • Scientists find fastest deep ocean current near Antarctica

    Scientists have discovered a fast-moving deep ocean current with the volume of 40 Amazon Rivers near Antarctica that will help researchers monitor the impacts of climate change on the world's oceans. A team of Australian and Japanese scientists, in a study published in Sunday's issue of the journal Nature Geoscience, found that the current is a key part of a global ocean circulation pattern that helps control the planet's climate. Scientists had previously detected evidence of the current but had no data on it. >> Read the Full Article