• Ships at Sea and What is Fair

    Ships are responsible for 2.7% of world carbon dioxide emissions. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) estimates that these emissions could increase by 150-250% by the year 2050 in line with the expected continued growth in international seaborne trade. So how does one reduce such emissions since ships are international in nature and there are over a hundred different nations with different rules. How can one be fair and be green? >> Read the Full Article
  • How Wind Farms Affect the Global Climate

    Wind energy has been a fast growing sector of the overall energy market. It is renewable energy that can be produced on an industrial scale that can rival the older established energy sources of coal, gas, oil, hydro, and nuclear. Now, it accounts for only two percent of the whole energy market, but government officials expect wind to produce one fifth of the total electricity supply in the United States by 2030. Proponents claim wind power can reduce the threat of global warming. However, a recent study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has found that the opposite is true. Mass produced wind farms can actually affect climate in a negative way. >> Read the Full Article
  • How Will New CAFE Standards Change Cars?

    How will new fuel efficiency requirements that went into effect last week change the look, feel — and price — of your next car? Experts say expect prices to rise, and smaller, lighter, technologically advanced vehicles to grow in number. New Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards published last week require most automakers to raise the average fuel efficiency of the vehicles they sell to 34.1 miles to the gallon by the 2016 model year rising to 35 mpg when efficiency gains in air conditioning are included. Currently, the CAFE for cars stands at 27.5 mpg, and 23.1 for light trucks. The standards are expect to reduce CO2 emissions by about 30 percent between 2012 and 2016, and save the country $240 billion from fuel savings, pollution reduction and reduced imports. Automakers have accepted the new standards because they are firm, ending a period of uncertainty; and nation-wide, so manufacturers do not have to contend with a patchwork of different state requirements. >> Read the Full Article
  • Canada, US to collaborate on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations

    Canada will not unilaterally impose limits on greenhouse gas emissions from industry, saying on Thursday that it will work in tandem with the United States, as it is doing with vehicle standards. "We don't anticipate doing this alone. Industrial regulations will require the same kind of collaboration that we've had with the United States on the transportation sector," Environment Minister Jim Prentice told Reuters. >> Read the Full Article
  • A New Geologic Era

    It is a new age of geological time or so some say called the Anthropocene Epoch. This is noted in the in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. (web issue March 29; print issue April 1). This is because of the dramatic recent or potential changes in the world such as climate warming and species extinction. The dawning of this new epoch may include the sixth largest mass extinction in the Earth's history. Whether the new era will be dramatic as the Jurassic with the end of the dinosaur is still to be determined. >> Read the Full Article
  • New Aggressive National Fuel Economy Standards Set for Passenger Cars and Light Trucks

    No fooling, the DOT and EPA, in response to one of the Obama Administration’s top priorities, have jointly established aggressive new federal rules that will significantly increase the fuel economy of all passenger cars and light trucks sold in the United States. They have also established new federal rules that would for the first time ever, set national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards for these vehicles. >> Read the Full Article
  • More Accurate Emissions Data Needed Worldwide, U.S. Researchers Say

    A lack of trust wafted through the Copenhagen air when negotiators gathered at December's United Nations climate summit. While many developing countries offered emission reduction commitments, several delegates from industrialized nations remained unconvinced that such reductions could be proven. >> Read the Full Article
  • Pollution during Asian Monsoon reaches Stratospheric Heights

    The economic growth in much of Asia has been quite remarkable in the last few decades. Unfortunately, along with growth comes intense pollution and atmospheric degradation. Pollutants from the region are being carried upward into the stratosphere during the monsoon season. Findings from a new study conducted by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) provide evidence of the global nature of this atmospheric phenomenon. >> Read the Full Article
  • First Wind Receives DOE Loan Guarantee to Finance Construction of Oahu-based Kahuku Wind Project

    03/05/2010 - First Wind, an independent US-based wind energy company, today was offered a conditional commitment from the US Department of Energy (DOE) for a $117 million loan guarantee to finance the construction of its proposed 30 megawatt (MW) Kahuku Wind project. Located in Kahuku, Hawaii, the project will have the capacity to generate enough clean, wind energy to power about 7,700 Oahu homes each year. First Wind plans to include innovative technology in this project, including a battery energy storage system. >> Read the Full Article
  • How Concentrated Solar Power Can Meet India’s Future Power Needs

    Solar energy is an enormous resource that is readily available in all countries throughout the world, and all the space above the earth. Long ago scientists calculated that an hour’s worth of sunlight bathing the planet held far more energy than humans worldwide could consume in a year. I firmly believe that India should accelerate the use of all forms of Renewable Energy (photovoltaic, thermal solar, solar lamps, solar pumps, wind power, biomass, biogas, and hydro), and more proactively promote Energy Efficiency. However, in this article, I will only focus on the use of Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technology to meet India’s future energy needs. Concentrated solar power plants have been used in California, USA since the 1980s. More recently, Pacific Gas & Electric has signed contracts to buy 500 megawatts of solar thermal power from two solar companies. First, NextEra Energy Resources will sell 250 megawatts of CSP generated power from the Genesis Solar Energy Project to be located in Riverside, California. Second, Abengoa’s Mojave Solar project will supply the remaining 250 megawatts from a plant located in San Bernardino County, California. Subject to California Public Utility Commission approval of the power purchase agreements, construction of these solar energy generating plants is expected to start in 2010 with operations planned to begin in 2013. Both these solar thermal power projects will contribute to meeting California’s aggressive Renewable Portfolio Standard, which calls for moving away from fossil fuels to solar and other renewable energy sources that avoid pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. >> Read the Full Article