• Honey, We're filling that hole in the Ozone Layer!

    The European Space Agency has presented the results of an important analysis of upper stratospheric ozone, important in shielding Earth from ultraviolet rays. The ozone layer is not distributed evenly, with more changes occurring in the upper stratosphere. By collecting data while looking sideways (limb viewing) rather than vertically downwards, instruments are able to provide highly accurate measurements of the stratosphere. By merging more than a decade of atmospheric data from European satellites, scientists have compiled a homogeneous long-term ozone record that allows them to monitor total ozone trends on a global scale – and the findings look promising. >> Read the Full Article
  • Floodgates Might Not Save Venice

    The construction of mobile floodgates aims to safeguard the 1,300-year-old island city of Venice. It's an ambitious engineering project, but some scientists say it may not be sufficient to protect Venice from rising sea levels due to climate change. Venice rose from mudflats in the middle of a lagoon which forms the largest wetland in the Mediterranean. One of the world's most endangered cities, it has been subject to increasing flooding due to sinking land — but also to rising sea levels. >> Read the Full Article
  • River Deltas Sinking

    A new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder indicates most of the world's low-lying river deltas are sinking from human activity, making them increasingly vulnerable to flooding from rivers and ocean storms and putting tens of millions of people at risk. >> Read the Full Article
  • Antarctica's hidden plumbing revealed

    The first complete map of the lakes beneath Antarctica's ice sheets reveals the continent's secret water network is far more dynamic than we thought. This could be acting as a powerful lubricant beneath glaciers, contributing to sea level rise. Unlike previous lake maps, which are confined to small regions, Ian Joughin at the University of Washington in Seattle and colleagues mapped 124 subglacial lakes across Antarctica using lasers on NASA's ICESat satellite (see map). >> Read the Full Article
  • Arctic Geese Skip Migration

    In the Fall of 2007, tens of thousands of small arctic geese called Pacific brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) decided not to go south for the winter. For these long-haul migratory birds, it was a dramatic choice -- they usually spend the cold months munching their favorite eel grass in the waters off Mexico's Baja peninsula. >> Read the Full Article
  • Arctic Ice Third-smallest on Record

    The Arctic's sea ice pack thawed to its third-lowest summer level on record, up slightly from the seasonal melt of the past two years but continuing an overall decline symptomatic of climate change, U.S. scientists said on Thursday. >> Read the Full Article
  • Croatia and Hungary to establish Europe´s largest river protected area - 20 years after the fall of the Iron Curtain

    Croatia and Hungary signed today a declaration to establish a Trans-Boundary UNESCO Biosphere Reserve that will protect their shared biodiversity hotspot along the Mura, Drava and Danube Rivers. This paves the way to create Europe’s largest river protection area. >> Read the Full Article
  • Killer Whales Die Without King Salmon

    Some killer whale populations favor king salmon so much that the whales will actually die when numbers of this largest member of the salmon family drop, according to new research. >> Read the Full Article
  • Global Warming Could Cool N. America

    Global warming could actually chill down North America within just a few decades, according to a new study that says a sudden cooling event gripped the region about 8,300 years ago. >> Read the Full Article
  • As climate shifts, birds follow

    Most bird species in California’s Sierra Nevadas have altered their ranges during the last century in response to changes in temperature and rainfall >> Read the Full Article