• Doctor Warns Consumers of Popcorn Fumes

    Consumers, not just factory workers, may be in danger from fumes from buttery flavoring in microwave popcorn, according to a warning letter to federal regulators from a doctor at a leading lung research hospital. >> Read the Full Article
  • New hope for children with rare cancer

    Pioneering cancer charity AICR (Association for International Cancer Research) has awarded its biggest grant of the year to a brilliant young Polish scientist, who has been working in Cambridge for the last five years to help him discover more about a rare disease in children that can lead to a particularly aggressive form of leukaemia. >> Read the Full Article
  • Britain To Decide On Human-Animal Embryo Research

    LONDON - British regulators will decide on Wednesday whether to permit the creation of hybrid human-animal embryos for research into illnesses such as Parkinson's, Motor Neurone Disease and Alzheimer's. Research in the controversial area has been on hold in Britain for nearly a year awaiting the outcome of a public consultation conducted by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA). Two teams of scientists have applied to the HFEA for permission to inject human cell nuclei into hollowed-out cow egg cells to overcome a shortage of donated human eggs. >> Read the Full Article
  • Project Underway To Develop Technology To Detect Human Exposure To Environmental Toxins

    UC Berkeley - Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have received a $4.7 million grant to develop cutting edge methods for detecting diseases in humans exposed to environmental contaminants. >> Read the Full Article
  • Mattel Plans Third Chinese Toy Recall: Report

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Toymaker Mattel Inc is to announce a third recall of Chinese-made toys because they may contain too much lead paint, the Associated Press reported on Tuesday. The latest recall involves a Fisher-Price toy and accessories to a Barbie playset and covers several hundred thousand units, the AP reported, citing two anonymous persons it said had been briefed by Mattel executives. Mattel, which has recently announced two recalls of millions of Chinese toys because of lead paint, did not immediately return a call seeking comment. >> Read the Full Article
  • Avocados May Help Prevent Oral Cancer

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Nutrients taken from avocados are able to thwart oral cancer cells, killing some and preventing pre-cancerous cells from developing into actual cancers, according to researchers at Ohio State University. Researchers found that extracts from Hass avocados kill or stop the growth of pre-cancerous cells that lead to oral cancer. Hass avocados are year-round fruits known for their distinctive bumpy skin that turns from green to purplish-black as they ripen. >> Read the Full Article
  • Breastfed Babies May Sleep Less When Mothers Smoke

    NEW YORK - Nursing mothers who smoke may be cutting their infant's nap times short, a new study shows. Babies whose mothers smoked shortly before breastfeeding napped about 20 minutes less over the following three and a half hours than those whose mothers had abstained from cigarettes for several hours, Dr. Julie A. Mennella and colleagues found. >> Read the Full Article
  • Rock Stars More Likely To Die Prematurely

    LONDON - Rock stars -- notorious for their "crash and burn" lifestyles -- really are more likely than other people to die before reaching old age. A study of more than 1,000 mainly British and North American artists, spanning the era from Elvis Presley to rapper Eminem, found they were two to three times more likely to suffer a premature death than the general population. Between 1956 and 2005 there were 100 deaths among the 1,064 musicians examined by researchers at the Centre for Public Health at Liverpool John Moores University. >> Read the Full Article
  • Study: More Vitamin D Could Mean Fewer Cancers

    NEW YORK - Thousands of cases of breast and colon cancers might be averted each year if people in colder climates raised their vitamin D levels, researchers estimate in a new report. A number of studies have suggested that vitamin D may be important in cancer risk. Much of this research is based on cancer rates at different latitudes of the globe; rates of breast, colon and ovarian cancer, for example, are lower in sunnier regions of the world than in Northern climates where cold winters limit people's sun exposure. >> Read the Full Article
  • New Data: Growth In Carbon Emissions Slowing

    LONDON - Growth in global emissions of the heat-trapping greenhouse gas carbon dioxide slowed slightly last year, preliminary data from the U.S. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) suggest. CDIAC is the primary source of climate-change data and information analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy. In the past, its preliminary emissions estimates have been subsequently revised upwards. "It is hard to put too much emphasis on the last number in a time series, it is always the most subject to revision," said Gregg Marland, senior scientist at CDIAC and at Austria's International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. >> Read the Full Article