• China Clamping Down On Polluters

    Beijing, China - Chinese leaders are vowing a more aggressive prosecution of polluters, keeping in step with demands from the public there for tougher enforcement of anti-pollution laws. More than 8,000 Chinese enterprises have been penalized for pollution offenses in the first eight months of this year but the vice director of China's environmental watchdog believes the results are "far below" the expectations of the public. >> Read the Full Article
  • Mandatory Testing Needed For Toys: Consumers Union

    Washington, D.C. - China's agreement with the U.S. government to eliminate the use of lead paint on toys exported to the U.S., announced today, is long overdue, says the Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports. The U.S. first banned lead paint on toys in 1978. "All exporters, including China, have an obligation to comply with U.S. law when exporting to this country," said Donald Mays, Senior Director of Product Safety Planning and Technical Administration for Consumers Union. "The flurry of recent recalls has undermined confidence in the safety of toys. Parents need to trust the toys they buy won't harm their children." >> Read the Full Article
  • Ontario’s Political Leaders, Polluted?

    Toronto, Ontario – Tests reveal that three Ontario political leaders - who willingly submitted to the testing - are contaminated with pollutants found in the environment and in everyday products, according to a report released today by Environmental Defence. For the first time in Canada, Environmental Defense tested for bisphenol A (found in hard plastic bottles and tin can linings), a hormone disruptor that is under review by the federal government. >> Read the Full Article
  • Panel Urges "Smarter" Tracking Of Risky Imports

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A Bush administration import safety panel urged government agencies on Monday to work together to focus on the riskiest products in a "fundamental change" in import monitoring, following a spate of tainted or unsafe goods from China. The panel headed by Health and Human Services Secretary Michael Leavitt told President George W. Bush in a report that inspecting all of the $2 trillion of imports that enter the United States each year would slow international trade and divert attention away from the riskiest products. "Instead, we have to be smarter about what we do," said the report of the Interagency Working Group on Import Safety. >> Read the Full Article
  • House of Representatives Plans To Go Carbon Neutral

    WASHINGTON - A new report details plans to move the U.S. House of Representatives to carbon-neutral operation by the end of 2008, to reduce energy consumption in House facilities by 50% from 2006 levels by 2017, and to “make House operations a model of sustainability.” The initiative, headed by Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D–CA) and Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D–MD), calls for the House to achieve carbon neutrality by purchasing electricity from renewable sources, purchasing carbon offsets on the Chicago Climate Exchange, and switching the fuel for the Capitol power plant from coal to natural gas. >> Read the Full Article
  • Chemicals Pollute Ontario’s Political Leaders

    Toronto, Ontario – Test results reveal that three Ontario political leaders are contaminated with pollutants found in the environment and in everyday products, according to a report released today by Environmental Defence. For the first time in Canada, Environmental Defence tested for bisphenol A (found in hard plastic bottles and tin can linings), a hormone disruptor that is under review by the federal government. >> Read the Full Article
  • South Africa Warns Nations Of Active Nuke Smugglers

    VIENNA (Reuters) - Parts of a global nuclear smuggling ring initiated by the disgraced father of Pakistan's atom bomb may remain active and nations must do more to crack down on the network, South Africa said on Tuesday. The plea followed last week's conviction by a South African court of a German engineer for his part in the network run by Abdul Qadeer Khan, who admitted giving proliferation-prone nuclear technology to nations under international embargo. The network apparently operated in more than 30 countries, senior South African envoy Abdul Minty told a meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency's board of governors. Some of those entities may remain active, he told reporters afterwards. >> Read the Full Article
  • Nuclear Industry Inches Toward New Construction In US

    SPRING CITY, Tennessee (Reuters) - When the Watts Bar Unit One here switched on in 1996 after a 23-year construction ordeal, it was the last of a generation of U.S. commercial nuclear power plants to emerge from a building cycle marred by massive cost over-runs and canceled plant orders. Now, the U.S. nuclear industry is hoping that its troubled building history will not repeat itself as it takes baby steps toward ending a 30-year nuclear construction hiatus. >> Read the Full Article
  • US Airlines Don't Want To Play By EU Emissions Rules

    BRUSSELS (Reuters) - A European Parliament committee sought on Tuesday to delay the inclusion of all airlines in the European Union's emissions trading scheme to 2012. The executive European Commission proposed last year that inter-EU flights be included in the EU scheme, aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, from 2011, while international flights into and out of the bloc should be included from 2012. >> Read the Full Article
  • U.S. farmers should curb fertilizer runoff: study

    U.S. farmers should be required to control soil erosion and fertilizer runoff from all land eligible for crop subsidies -- which would be a major expansion of "conservation compliance" rules now in place, an environmental group said on Monday. >> Read the Full Article