• Forest Chief Touts Ethanol to Power Cars

    The U.S. Forest Service chief is proposing replacing 15 percent of the nation's gasoline with ethanol made from wood, while doubling the amount of carbon dioxide emissions absorbed by public and private forests. "These are ambitious goals, and they would take a concerted national effort to reach," Forest Service Chief Abigail Kimbell said in remarks prepared for a speech before the Society of Environmental Journalists Friday night in San Francisco. >> Read the Full Article
  • Volunteers Help Monitor Nation's Rivers

    Day after day, Chauncey Moran leaves his backwoods cabin, packs his pickup with gear and embarks on a scientific mission: checking the health of the Yellow Dog River. Friends call the 62-year-old retiree "River Walker" for his devotion to the trout stream, which meanders through forests and sandy plains in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and eventually feeds into Lake Superior. >> Read the Full Article
  • California air board plans new regulations

    The California Air Resources Board said on Friday it would step up the pace of new regulations to fight global warming in the most populous U.S. state. The air board also added measures that go beyond the requirements of California's 2006 landmark law to reduce carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent by 2020. >> Read the Full Article
  • Acid rain has a disproportionate impact on coastal waters

    Research Suggests Sulfur, Nitrogen Emissions Play a Role in Changing Chemistry Near the CoastResearch suggests sulfur, nitrogen emissions play a role in changing chemistry near the coast The release of sulfur and nitrogen into the atmosphere by power plants and agricultural activities plays a minor role in making the ocean more acidic on a global scale, but the impact is greatly amplified in the shallower waters of the coastal ocean, according to new research by atmospheric and marine chemists. >> Read the Full Article
  • FEMA Investigates Emergency Housing Air Quality

    Washington - The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced in August 2007 that it had suspended the installation, sale, transfer, and donation of emergency-housing trailers until concerns over high levels of formaldehyde can be investigated. A common ingredient in pressed-wood products, including particleboard, formaldehyde can cause eye, nose, and throat irritation; wheezing and coughing; fatigue; skin rashes; headaches; nosebleeds; and severe allergic reactions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency considers formaldehyde a probable human carcinogen, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer calls it a known human carcinogen. >> Read the Full Article
  • Global Rules Needed To Curb Ship Emissions

    HELSINKI (Reuters) - The world's shipping industry needs global regulations that are consistently enforced by the United Nations if it is to cut emissions, the chairman of the International Chamber of Shipping said on Friday. Public pressure is building for ship owners to curb air pollution and take part in markets in permits to emit sulfur and greenhouse gases. Shipping accounts for about 10 percent of world sulfur dioxide emissions, a cause of acid rain, and large amounts of toxic nitrous oxide and particulates such as soot. >> Read the Full Article
  • Pipeline Co. Pleads Guilty, Pays $1 Million for Fish Kill in Kansas

    Mid-America Pipeline Company, pleaded guilty yesterday to negligently releasing 200,000 gallons of ammonia into a Kansas creek, requiring the evacuation of nearby residents and killing 25,000 fish. The company agreed to pay a $1 million criminal penalty. >> Read the Full Article
  • Sao Paulo Bans Outdoor Ads in Fight Against Pollution

    It looks like the Bay of Bengal could be the victim of the next major tsunami. A report published in the Nature journal today suggests that there is "compelling evidence" for tsunami-triggering earthquake activity in the region, north of the area where 2004’s tsunami hit. >> Read the Full Article
  • Shell Argentina denies pollution charges

    Shell defended its environmental record in Argentina on Thursday and warned of possible domestic energy shortages after the Argentine government shut the company's only refinery in South America on charges of pollution. >> Read the Full Article
  • It's 'No Car Day' in Shanghai

    The Shanghai Municipal Government is to hold its first "No Car Day" on September 22, following the four-day test held last week in Beijing. Almost a third of the city's vehicles will be ordered off the roads in a bid to improve air quality and ease congestion. >> Read the Full Article