Environmental Policy

Research suggests eating beans instead of beef would sharply reduce greenhouse gasses
May 22, 2017 03:49 PM - Loma Linda University Adventist Health Sciences Center

A team of researchers from four American universities says the key to reducing harmful greenhouse gases (GHG) in the short term is more likely to be found on the dinner plate than at the gas pump.

The team, headed by Loma Linda University (LLU) researcher Helen Harwatt, PhD, suggests that one simple change in American eating habits would have a large impact on the environment: if Americans would eat beans instead of beef, the United States would immediately realize approximately 50 to 75 percent of its GHG reduction targets for the year 2020.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Climate Topic

ADVERTISEMENT

Study: Warm Atlantic waters contribute to sea ice decline
April 10, 2017 03:17 PM - University of Alaska Fairbanks

A University of Alaska Fairbanks study has determined that warmer water migrating from the Atlantic Ocean is a surprisingly powerful contributor to Arctic sea ice decline.

Research led by Igor Polyakov, a professor at UAF’s International Arctic Research Center and College of Natural Science and Mathematics, has found that Atlantic currents contribute to sea ice loss in the Arctic Ocean at a rate comparable to warming air temperatures.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Climate Topic

SPOTLIGHT

The Dangers Behind Fast Food Packaging

Susan Bird, Care2

We’ve all known for a long time that eating fast food is bad for you. It’s greasy, fatty, high in sodium and the calorie count is obscene. Now comes news that even the packaging that food comes in might be dangerous to your health.

A new study found dangerous chemical compounds in almost half of the 400 fast food containers it tested from 27 fast food franchises. Packaging tested in this study came from the Big Four: McDonald’s, Chipotle Mexican Grill, Starbucks and Yum! Brands, Inc., which operates Taco Bell, KFC, Pizza Hut and WingStreet.

The substances in question are perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs). That’s the same stuff that once was used to make Dupont’s Teflon before it had to be removed from the market. It’s also used in carpeting, furniture, clothing and cosmetics because of its water-repellant and stain-resistant qualities. We’re exposed to it every day.

What's new on our Community Blog



Protected: How does wind turbines work?

September 6th, 2016
There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Protected: But what is the wind ?

September 6th, 2016
There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Protected: Wind Energy

September 6th, 2016
There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Member Press Releases

More Press Releases

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy

2017©. Copyright Environmental News Network