Top Stories

When Imaging Atoms, Blurrier Is Better

Electron microscopy is built on a bitter irony: The process of beaming electrons allows scientists to peer into the atomic structure of biomolecules and materials, but the electrons can also damage their target.

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Nishinoshima Belches Ash and Lava

A young volcanic island in the western Pacific Ocean has been going through some growing pains.

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Keeping a Steady Eye on Sea Level Change From Space

Coastal areas around the world are contending with the consequences of a warming planet including droughts and floods, in addition to changing sea levels.

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How to Tackle Climate Change, Food Security and Land Degradation

Rutgers-led research highlights lesser-known options with fewer trade-offs.

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Algae Species Discovered Infesting NW Waters Has Been Identified

A newly-identified, fast-growing species of algae poses a major threat to coral reefs and the ocean ecosystem.

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Climate – Predicting Fire Risk

Oak Ridge National Laboratory developed a method that uses machine learning to predict seasonal fire risk in Africa.

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A Chemical Cocktail of Air Pollution in Beijing, China During COVID-19 Outbreak

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) spreads rapidly around the world, and has limited people's outdoor activities substantially.

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Study Reveals Many Great Lakes State Parks Impacted by Record-High Water Levels

Every summer millions of people visit parks and protected areas along the shorelines of the Great Lakes to camp, hike, swim and explore nature’s beauty.

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New Research Reveals Regulatory Features Of The Maize Genome During Early Reproductive Development

Growth and development of all organisms depends on coordinated regulation of gene expression in time and space, and this is largely controlled by non-coding sequences in the genome.

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Future Texas hurricanes: Fast like Ike or slow like Harvey?

Climate change will intensify winds that steer hurricanes north over Texas in the final 25 years of this century, increasing the odds for fast-moving storms like 2008's Ike compared with slow-movers like 2017's Harvey, according to new research.

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