Top Stories

Landmark Paper Finds Light at End of the Tunnel for World’s Wildlife and Wild Places

A new WCS paper published in the journal BioScience finds that the enormous trends toward population stabilization, poverty alleviation, and urbanization are rewriting the future of biodiversity conservation in the 21st century, offering new hope for the world’s wildlife and wild places.

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NASA's GPM Sees Tropical Cyclone Fakir Forming Near Madagascar

The southwest Indian Ocean cyclone season started on November 15, 2017 and will officially end on April 30, 2018. A tropical cyclone called Fakir formed on April 23 near northeastern Madagascar and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite looked at the storm's rainfall rates. 

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Could Eating Moss be Good for Your Gut?

An international team of scientists including the University of Adelaide has discovered a new complex carbohydrate in moss that could possibly be exploited for health or other uses.

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Trees with Grassy Areas Soften Summer Heat

Trees cool their environment  and "heat islands" like Munich benefit from it. However, the degree of cooling depends greatly on the tree species and the local conditions. In a recent study, scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) compared two species of urban trees.

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Corals Are in Serious Trouble. This Lab Could Help Save Them

Nestled among giant fish tanks at the California Academy of Sciences, there's a black box—just big enough to hold six aquariums and maybe five humans. What it lacks in size, though, it makes up for in preciousness: Running here is a experiment that could help save corals from annihilation.

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Scientists suggest protecting ‘reefs of hope’ may offset climate-change damage to coral reefs

Among the most damaging effects that climate change has wrought on the natural world are those sustained by coral reefs.

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Online Public Viewer of U.S. Wind Turbine Locations and Characteristics Released

 Today, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in partnership with DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the American Wind Energy Association, released the United States Wind Turbine Database (USWTDB) and the USWTDB Viewer to access this new public dataset.

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New DNA Screening Reveals Whose Blood the Vampire Bat is Drinking

The vampire bat lives up to its name. Its diet consists of blood, which it gets by biting animals and lapping up their blood. The vampire bat prefers to feed on domestic animals such as cows and pigs. When it does so, there is a risk of transmission of pathogens such as rabies. Now, a new study lead by Assistant Professor Kristine Bohmann from the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, describes a new DNA method to efficiently screen many vampire bat blood meal and faecal samples with a high success rate and thereby determine which animals the vampire bats have fed on blood from. Furthermore, the authors show that the technique can be used to simultaneously assess the vampire bat’s population structure.

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Meditation Could Help Anxiety and Cardiovascular Health

It sounds like a late-night commercial: In just one hour you can reduce your anxiety levels and some heart health risk factors. But a recent study with 14 participants shows preliminary data that even a single session of meditation can have cardiovascular and psychological benefits for adults with mild to moderate anxiety.

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“Fight, Flight, or Freeze:” Animal Study Connects Fear Behavior, Rhythmic Breathing, Smell Centers of Brain

“Take a deep breath” is the mantra of every anxiety-reducing advice list ever written. And for good reason. There’s increasing physiological evidence connecting breathing patterns with the brain regions that control mood and emotion.

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