Top Stories

For Arid, Mars-Like Desert, Rain Brings Death

When rains fell on the arid Atacama Desert, it was reasonable to expect floral blooms to follow. Instead, the water brought death.

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First Tally of U.S.-Russia Polar Bears Finds a Healthy Population

Not all polar bears are in the same dire situation due to retreating sea ice, at least not right now.

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Competition for Shrinking Groundwater

The U.S. has less fresh groundwater than previously thought, according to research by UC Santa Barbara scientists.

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New Study Reveals Natural Solutions Can Reduce Global Warming

U.S. forests, wetlands and agricultural lands could absorb one-fifth of greenhouse gas pollution — equivalent to emissions from all U.S. vehicles.

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Tropical Trees in the Andes are Moving Up — Toward Extinction

An international study led by University of Miami tropical biologists reveals that tropical trees are migrating upslope to escape climate change, but not fast enough.

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Climate Simulations Project Wetter, Windier Hurricanes

Berkeley Lab computer simulations find climate change making hurricanes more intense.

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Seismic Study Reveals Huge Amount of Water Dragged into Earth’s Interior

Slow-motion collisions of tectonic plates under the ocean drag about three times more water down into the deep Earth than previously estimated, according to a first-of-its-kind seismic study that spans the Mariana Trench.

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How Weather and Climate Shape Earth's Life Sustaining Surface

CU Boulder researchers set out to understand why this life-sustaining and water-storing blanket of soil and the underlying weathered rock vary so much from one place to another.

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Millennial Farmers

When the phone rang at 5 a.m., Graham Tapley felt the bottom of his stomach drop.

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‘Humongous fungus’: Twenty-five years later, this Armillaria gallica is bigger than first thought

A giant individual of the fungus, Armillaria gallica, or honey mushroom, first studied 25 years ago by James B. Anderson, a professor emeritus of biology at the University of Toronto Mississauga, is not only alive and well but is older and larger than Anderson originally estimated.

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