Top Stories

Water Use for Fracking Has Risen By Up To 770 Percent Since 2011

The amount of water used per well for hydraulic fracturing surged by up to 770 percent between 2011 and 2016 in all major U.S. shale gas and oil production regions, a new Duke University study finds.

>> Read the Full Article

Food for Thought: Global Study Shows Environmentally-Friendly Farming Can Increase Productivity

A major new study involving researchers from the University of York has measured a global shift towards more sustainable agricultural systems that provide environmental improvements at the same time as increases in food production.

>> Read the Full Article

Human Wastewater Valuable to Global Agriculture, Economics

It may seem off-putting to some, but human waste is full of nutrients that can be recycled into valuable products that could promote agricultural sustainability and better economic independence for some developing countries.

>> Read the Full Article

Study Confirms Truth Behind Darwin's Moth

Scientists have revisited – and confirmed – one of the most famous textbook examples of evolution in action.

>> Read the Full Article

Amazon Pirating Water from Neighboring Rio Orinoco

The Amazon River is slowly stealing a 40,000-square-kilometer (25,000-square-mile) drainage basin from the upper Orinoco River, according to new research suggesting this may not be the first time the world’s largest river has expanded its territory by poaching from a neighbor.

>> Read the Full Article

Particulate Pollution's Impact Varies Greatly Depending on Where it Originated

When it comes to aerosol pollution, as the old real estate adage says, location is everything.

>> Read the Full Article

Progress Toward Personalized Medicine

A few little cells that are different from the rest can have a big effect. For example, individual cancer cells may be resistant to a specific chemotherapy—causing a relapse in a patient who would otherwise be cured. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a microfluidics-based chip for the manipulation and subsequent nucleic-acid analysis of individual cells. The technique uses local electric fields to highly efficiently “trap” the cells (dielectrophoresis).

>> Read the Full Article

Research Focuses on Factors that Fuel New Plant Invasions

A new research study published in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management tackles those questions and provides insights that can benefit land managers.

>> Read the Full Article

‘Abrupt Thaw’ of Permafrost Beneath Lakes Could Significantly Affect Climate Change Models

Methane released by thawing permafrost from some Arctic lakes could significantly accelerate climate change, according to a new University of Alaska Fairbanks-led study.

>> Read the Full Article

Statins Associated with Improvement of Rare Lung Disease

FINDINGS
In the first study of its kind, researchers have found that cholesterol-lowering statins may improve the conditions of people with a rare lung disease called autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The research also suggested that two new tests could help diagnose the condition.

>> Read the Full Article