From: International Union for Conservation of Nature
Published September 14, 2017 08:53 AM

Once-Abundant Ash Tree and Antelope Species Face Extinction — IUCN Red List

North America’s most widespread and valuable ash tree species are on the brink of extinction due to an invasive beetle decimating their populations, while the loss of wilderness areas and poaching are contributing to the declining numbers of five African antelope species, according to the latest update of The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™

Today’s IUCN Red List update also reveals a dramatic decline of grasshoppers and millipedes endemic to Madagascar, and the extinction of the Christmas Island Pipistrelle bat.

The IUCN Red List now includes 87,967 species of which 25,062 are threatened with extinction.

“Our activities as humans are pushing species to the brink so fast that it’s impossible for conservationists to assess the declines in real time,” says Inger Andersen IUCN Director General. “Even those species that we thought were abundant and safe – such as antelopes in Africa or ash trees in the U.S. – now face an imminent threat of extinction.

Read more at International Union for Conservation of Nature

Photo credit: Famartin via Wikimedia Commons

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy

2017©. Copyright Environmental News Network