Top Stories

Mount St. Helens, Forty Years Later: How NOAA Monitors Volcanoes From Earth Orbit

Forty years ago today, iconic Mount St. Helens erupted in southwestern Washington state in the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in U.S. history.

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Mount St. Helens

In May 1980, a satellite watched the mountain violently erupt; satellites over the next forty years watched it recover.

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Popcorn Clouds over Rio de Janeiro

Clouds formed over rural areas and the cities but are noticeably absent above Guanabara Bay and the ocean due to the mechanisms of cloud formation.

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Nighttime Waves Over the South Atlantic

A layer of marine stratocumulus clouds off the west coast of Africa displayed some particularly complex wave patterns.

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UIC Study Examines Impact of Chicago River Reversal on Region’s Aquatic Environments, Fauna

Prior to European settlement, wetlands, lakes and streams were the major landscape features of the Chicago region.

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New Research Could Help Save Species From Extinction

New research from The Australian National University (ANU) could help protect our plants and animals from extinction, by allowing scientists to predict which currently thriving species might be at risk in the future.

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New Study Shows Persistence of Meltwater Biodiversity Despite Glacier Loss

Glaciers are retreating in Glacier National Park and across the globe due to climate change.

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Long-Term Data Show Hurricanes Are Getting Stronger

In almost every region of the world where hurricanes form, their maximum sustained winds are getting stronger.

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What Does Drought Mean for Endangered California Salmon?

Climate change is projected to lead to more frequent and severe droughts in California.

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Ambitious EU Climate Efforts Could Increase Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Rest of the World

The more the EU economy succeeds in dialing down greenhouse gas emissions, the more the rest of the world will turn them up – unless a similar level of green ambitions is shared by others.

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