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NASA's Newly Rediscovered IMAGE Mission Provided Key Aurora Research

On Jan. 20, 2018, amateur astronomer Scott Tilley detected an unexpected signal coming from what he later postulated was NASA’s long-lost IMAGE satellite, which had not been in contact since 2005. On Jan. 30, NASA — along with help from a community of IMAGE scientists and engineers — confirmed that the signal was indeed from the IMAGE spacecraft. Whatever the next steps for IMAGE may be, the mission’s nearly six years in operation provided robust research about the space around Earth that continue to guide science to this day.

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Ecuador: Deforestation Destroys More Dry Forest Than Climate Change

Tropical forests all over the world are at risk. Two of the main threats are the deforestation for arable land and climate change. Scientists from Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Thünen-Institute compared the losses due to deforestation with those that would result in extreme climate change scenarios in Ecuador. Although global warming is likely to change the distribution of species, deforestation will result in the loss of more dry forests than predicted by climate change damage.

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NASA Measured Rainfall from Fehi's Remnants in New Zealand

The remnants of Tropical Cyclone Fehi brought rain to New Zealand before it fizzled out. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall from its vantage point in space.

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U.S. Mines Produced an Estimated $75.2 Billion in Minerals During 2017

U.S. mines produced an estimated $75.2 billion of raw mineral materials in 2017 – a 6 percent increase over 2016 – the U.S. Geological Survey announced Wednesday, January 31, in its annual Mineral Commodity Summaries.

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Two York University mathematicians determine how to stay a step ahead of C. difficile

Clostridium Difficile, or C. difficile, strikes fear into the hearts of many. This life-threatening infection, caused through contact with bacteria, can develop rapidly even under the watchful eye of hospital staff. In fact, it is often spread in health care facilitates or nursing homes due to proximity of the bacteria.

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New Study Challenges Popular Theory About Dwarf Galaxies

A new international study involving ANU has found a plane of dwarf galaxies orbiting around Centaurus A in a discovery that challenges a popular theory about how dwarf galaxies are spread around the Universe. 

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Shedding Light on Zooplankton in the Dark

Some of the smallest creatures on the planet — zooplankton — make the most widespread vertical migration of biomass on Earth. Billions of these animals move deeper into the ocean and away from the light during the day to avoid predators, and migrate up again in the dark of night to feed.

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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite Tracking Tropical Cyclone Cebile

Tropical Cyclone Cebile was still a powerful hurricane in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm. 

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Supermassive Black Holes Can Feast On One Star Per Year

CU Boulder researchers have discovered a mechanism that explains the persistence of asymmetrical stellar clusters surrounding supermassive black holes in some galaxies and suggests that during post-galactic merger periods, orbiting stars could be flung into the black hole and destroyed at a rate of one per year.

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Polar Bears Finding it Harder to Catch Enough Seals to Meet Energy Demands

A new study finds polar bears in the wild have higher metabolic rates than previously thought, and as climate change alters their environment a growing number of bears are unable to catch enough prey to meet their energy needs.

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