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Sat, Feb

New Research Sheds Light on Why Some People Are More Sensitive to Stress

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Stress is a natural biological process enabling us to deal with the world around us. In short bursts, such as exercise or watching a thrilling film, stress is beneficial to the body. But when stress is too much or lasts too long, the effects can be detrimental to our health.

Stress is a natural biological process enabling us to deal with the world around us. In short bursts, such as exercise or watching a thrilling film, stress is beneficial to the body. But when stress is too much or lasts too long, the effects can be detrimental to our health.

New research by University of Guelph professor Ray Lu, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, sheds light on the molecular basis of our sensitivity to stress, paving the way for possible new treatment options.

At the molecular level, the mechanics of stress response are complex, employing the immune, metabolic, endocrine and nervous systems. In addition, the type of stress may alter how the body uses these different processes. For this reason, figuring out how to deal with the complications of stress has remained a challenge.

The most studied molecular lynchpins of stress have been hormones — among the most well known is glucocorticoid (GC), known as cortisol in mammals.

 

Continue reading at University of Guelph.

Photo via University of Guelph.