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Fruit fly breakthrough may help human blindness research

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For decades, scientists have known that blue light will make fruit flies go blind, but it wasn’t clear why. Now, a Purdue University study has found how this light kills cells in the flies’ eyes, and that could prove a useful model for understanding human ocular diseases such as macular degeneration.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - For decades, scientists have known that blue light will make fruit flies go blind, but it wasn’t clear why. Now, a Purdue University study has found how this light kills cells in the flies’ eyes, and that could prove a useful model for understanding human ocular diseases such as macular degeneration.

Vikki Weake, assistant professor in Purdue’s Department of Biochemistry, studies aging in the eye and the genetic mechanisms that lead to vision loss as people age. Working with Donald Ready, a professor in Purdue’s Department of Biological Sciences, and Daniel Leon-Salas, an associate professor in the School of Engineering Technology, Weake led a team that compared older fruit flies susceptible to vision loss when exposed to blue light with young flies that are immune to the effects of that light.

“When you put older flies in the presence of really strong blue light, you basically overload the neurons and the photoreceptor cells in their eyes die,” said Weake, whose findings were published in the journal npj Aging and Mechanisms of Disease, a partner journal of Nature. “But this doesn’t have to be. There are natural conditions that confer resilience as we see with young flies.”

Weake’s team found that retinal degeneration in the flies strongly correlated with lipid peroxidation, oxidative damage caused to lipids by reactive oxygen species. Young flies showed no signs of lipid peroxidation.

 

Continue reading at Purdue University.

Image via Purdue University.