• Lost world of fanged frogs and giant rats discovered in Papua New Guinea

    A lost world populated by fanged frogs, grunting fish and tiny bear-like creatures has been discovered in a remote volcanic crater on the Pacific island of Papua New Guinea. >> Read the Full Article
  • Fish Farms Supply 50% of Global Harvest

    Fish farms, once a fledgling industry, now account for 50 percent of the fish consumed globally, according to a new report by an international team of researchers. And while getting more efficient, it is putting strains on marine resources by consuming large amounts of feed made from wild fish harvested from the sea, the authors conclude. Their findings are published in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. >> Read the Full Article
  • Maldives to introduce green tax on tourists

    The Maldives archipelago, threatened by rising sea levels blamed on climate change, said on Monday it would introduce a new environment tax on all tourists who use its resorts and provide its economic lifeline. >> Read the Full Article
  • Humans Causing Erosion Comparable To World’s Largest Rivers And Glaciers

    A new study finds that large-scale farming projects can erode the Earth's surface at rates comparable to those of the world's largest rivers and glaciers. Published online in the journal Nature Geoscience, the research offers stark evidence of how humans are reshaping the planet. It also finds that - contrary to previous scholarship - rivers are as powerful as glaciers at eroding landscapes. >> Read the Full Article
  • Methane Gas Could Increase From Oceanic Vents

    New MIT research by Denise Brehm, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy looked at the potential for a compound affect of warming global temperatures on the level of methane being released by oceanic vents. The premise is that rising global temperatures could be accompanied by melting permafrost in arctic regions and that this could initiate the release of underground methane into the atmosphere. Once released, that methane gas would speed up global warming by trapping the Earth's heat radiation about 20 times more efficiently than does the better-known greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide. >> Read the Full Article
  • Arctic Geological Record Correlates Warming to Man

    Long-term climate records from the Arctic provide strong new evidence that human-caused global warming can override Earth's natural heating and cooling cycles, U.S. researchers reported this week in the journal Science. >> Read the Full Article
  • Arctic Warming Overtakes 2,000 Years of Natural Cooling

    Arctic temperatures have been dropping for the last 2,000 years. Since 1900, temperature anomaly has turned positive, indicating temperatures started becoming warmer than the long term average, new research indicates. The study, which incorporates geologic records and computer simulations, provides new evidence that the Arctic would be cooling if not for greenhouse gas emissions that are overpowering natural climate patterns. The Summer temperature anomaly changed from about – 1 to + 1 which is a very large change. >> Read the Full Article
  • Roads are ruining the rainforests

    "THE best thing you could do for the Amazon is to bomb all the roads." That might sound like an eco-terrorist's threat, but they're actually the words of Eneas Salati, one of Brazil's most respected scientists. Thomas Lovejoy, a leading American biologist, is equally emphatic: "Roads are the seeds of tropical forest destruction." >> Read the Full Article
  • Schwarzenegger to Obama cabinet: Water... please!

    California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has demanded that President Barack Obama's cabinet rethink federal policy that would divert water from parched farms and cities to threatened fish, his administration said on Wednesday. >> Read the Full Article
  • Climate-change technology risks 'catastrophic' outcome

    Risky and unproven climate-changing technologies could have "catastrophic consequences" for the earth and humankind if used irresponsibly, according to a new report. >> Read the Full Article