• Our best guess about global warming may be wrong

    Fifty-five million years ago, the world was a much warmer place. The poles were ice-free year-round. Palm trees grew in Alaska. Forests stretched right into the Arctic Circle. There, swamps like those in today’s southeastern United States hosted alligators, snakes, and giant tortoises. Scientists call this time in Earth’s history the Eocene, the dawn of the age of mammals. And climatologists have naturally taken a keen interest in how it began. They know that a dramatic spike in carbon dioxide associated with rapid climate change kicked off the epoch – called the "Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum" (PETM). But what scientists don’t understand about the PETM may hold the most relevant lessons for where the world’s climate is headed today. >> Read the Full Article
  • Oceans Could Absorb Much More CO2

    Earth's oceans are vast reservoirs of carbon dioxide (CO2) with the potential to control the pace of global warming. >> Read the Full Article
  • New Catch Share Program in Gulf of Mexico

    NOAA’s Fisheries Service will implement catch shares in the Gulf of Mexico commercial grouper and tilefish fisheries beginning January 1, 2010, in an effort to reduce overcapacity and improve profitability and working conditions for commercial fishermen of these species. >> Read the Full Article
  • West Antarctica Key to Missing Ice

    Assessing the changing climate on Earth is not easy. Much depends on data that can be used to infer past climatic conditions. No one really knows for sure since there were no weather stations or written records. New research by scientists at UC Santa Barbara indicates a possible Antarctic location for ice that seemed to be missing at a key point in climate history 34 million years ago. The research, which has important implications for climate change, is described in a paper published today in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. >> Read the Full Article
  • 10,000 Homes Threatened in Los Angeles FIres

    The unstoppable Angeles National Forest fire threatened 10,000 homes Saturday night as it more than tripled in size and chewed through a rapidly widening swath of the Crescenta Valley, where flames closed in on backyards and at least 1,000 homes were ordered evacuated. Sending an ominous plume of smoke above the Los Angeles Basin, the fire was fueled by unrelenting hot weather and dense brush that has not burned in 60 years. >> Read the Full Article
  • Los Angeles Wildfires Fueled by Heat

    Firefighters battling four wildfires around Los Angeles saved hundreds of homes in an affluent coastal community but struggled against a larger fire coming down the mountains toward another exclusive suburb. With temperatures in excess of 100 Fahrenheit (37 Celsius), flames flared above La Canada Flintridge, where nearly 900 homes were under voluntary evacuation, 1,500 acres had burned and containment was zero percent. >> Read the Full Article
  • Sun Spot-Climate Link

    Small changes in the energy output of the sun can have a major impact on global weather patterns, such as the intensity of the Indian monsoon, that could be predicted years in advance, a team of scientists said. >> Read the Full Article
  • Global Warming Warps Marine Food Webs

    Teasing apart the complex ways in which global warming will affect ocean life has been tough. But new research suggests that a simple ecological theory may explain at least one piece of the puzzle: the effect on marine food webs. And the news may not be all bad. >> Read the Full Article
  • Mammal database identifies species destined for trouble

    What would happen to polar bears if people built towns in the deep Arctic? Or to tiger populations, if India's grasslands turned to desert? >> Read the Full Article
  • Atrazine in US Drinking Water Found Widespread

    A widely used pesticide known to impact wildlife development and, potentially, human health has contaminated watersheds and drinking water throughout much of the United States, according to a new report released today by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). Banned by the European Union, atrazine is the most commonly detected pesticide in U.S. waters and is a known endocrine disruptor, which means that it affects human and animal hormones. >> Read the Full Article