• Nobel Peace Prize could go to climate campaigner

    OSLO (Reuters) - The 2007 Nobel Peace Prize could go to a climate campaigner such as ex-U.S. Vice-President Al Gore or Inuit activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier, reinforcing a view that global warming is a threat to world security, experts say.

    The winner of the $1.5 million prize, perhaps the world's top accolade, will be announced in Oslo on October 12 from a field of 181 candidates. The prize can be split up to three ways.

    "There are reasonably good chances that the peace prize will be awarded to someone working to stop the dramatic climate problems the world is facing," said Boerge Brende, a former Norwegian environment minister.

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  • Plunder or Protection: WWF Calls For Safeguarding Coral Sea

    Sydney, Australia – Recognized as one of world's last tropical marine wilderness regions, WWF is calling on the Australian government to declare the entire Coral Sea region a marine protected area. The Coral Sea stretches over 780,000km2 of ocean — from the outer boundary of Australia's Great Barrier Reef Marine Park to the South Pacific Islands of Vanuatu, New Caledonia and the Solomon Islands. >> Read the Full Article
  • Western Canadian Pine Beetle infestation Spreads

    VANCOUVER, British Columbia  - Voracious beetles that have ravaged more than 9 million hectares (35,000 square miles) of British Columbia's forests have wiped out about 40 percent of the infested region's marketable pine trees, according to a report released on Monday. >> Read the Full Article
  • Scientists study Fla. coral reef changes

    A nine-day mission that began Monday in the world's only permanent working undersea laboratory is like living in a fishbowl in more ways than one: Anyone with an Internet connection can watch the researchers work and hang out 60 feet below the surface. >> Read the Full Article
  • Arctic Ocean Sea-ice Getting Thinner: New Study

    Bremerhaven - Large areas of the Arctic sea-ice are only one metre thick this year, equating to an approximate 50 percent thinning as compared to the year 2001. These are the initial results from the latest Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association lead expedition to the North Polar Sea.   50 scientists have been on board the Research ship- Polarstern for two and a half months, their main aim; to carry out research on the sea-ice areas in the central Arctic. Amongst other things, they have found out that not only the ocean currents are changing, but community structures in the Arctic are also altering.  Autonomous measuring-buoys have been placed out, and they will contribute valuable data, also after the expedition is finished, to the study of the environmental changes occurring in this region.

     

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  • More Christians Embrace Organic Farming

    COMMERCE, Texas (Reuters) - The Hale family has embraced organic farming because it is healthy, good for the environment and less cruel to animals. But do not mistake them for nature-worshiping New Agers or back-to-basics hippies.

    They are part of a small movement of conservative Christians who believe the Bible demands an organic or natural approach to agriculture.

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  • Plan for chemical plants on Indian island draws flak

    A plan to establish a chemicals industry complex off India's east coast has run into political and environmental problems, only months after a similar project had to be abandoned. >> Read the Full Article
  • Could Kyoto Protocol use a touch of Montreal?

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Could the solution to global warming be as simple as a switch of cities? For those who think the Kyoto Protocol is not working to cut greenhouse gas emissions that are heating the planet, why not take some lessons from the Montreal Protocol, praised as the world's most successful climate treaty? Both the United Nations and the Bush administration plan to try out this idea this week as parties to the treaty gather in Montreal, 20 years after the pact to cut ozone-depleting chemicals was signed. Sunday, the anniversary of the signing, has been dubbed International Ozone Day. >> Read the Full Article
  • China to crack down on rich flouting one-child rule

    BEIJING (Reuters) - Rich Chinese people who flout the country's family planning policies, which usually limit couples to one child, will face higher fines under tougher new enforcement guidelines, state media said on Saturday. The China Daily said the move to assess fines in line with the violator's income came in response to widespread concern that current fines did not serve as enough of a deterrent to the well-off, essentially allowing them to treat the fines as a fee for having more than one child. >> Read the Full Article
  • Island Building Aids River's Habitat

    On the Mississippi River below the verdant bluffs that mark the far southern Minnesota-Wisconsin line, the federal government is waging a multi-million dollar campaign against the elements. >> Read the Full Article