• Fishless Lake in Adirondacks Shows Signs of Recovery

    Chuck Boylen and his crew of six had been hiking for around two hours, surrounded by nothing but the tree-lined, towering Adirondack Mountains, when they reached the wide-open space of Brooktrout Lake. The goal of the research is to determine how the Clean Air Act, passed in 1990, has affected the lakes in the Adirondacks, many of which had become so acidic they no longer had any fish. >> Read the Full Article
  • Russia tiger habitat gets a boost with protection of key tree species

    Moscow, Russia, 29 July 2010, World Tiger Day—the Russian government has introduced measures to protect the Korean pine, a key species found in Amur tiger habitat in the Russian Far East. Around 400 Amur tigers survive in the native Korean pine forests of the Russian Far East and north-east China, where the pine nuts are an essential food source for tiger prey species. >> Read the Full Article
  • Rescue Plan for Endangered Sea Turtles in the Gulf of Mexico

    Wildlife experts in the United States have announced an ambitious plan to rescue hundreds of turtle nests and eggs from the potential impacts of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Using a strategy never tested before on such a massive scale, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will coordinate the collection of around 80,000 eggs from 800 nests on the beaches of Alabama and northwest Florida and move them hundreds of miles away to the oil-free Atlantic coast. >> Read the Full Article
  • Good News for Gulf Fishermen

    In response to the oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, the federal government closed off vast areas of the ocean to fishing operations. Much of the area was closed off as a precaution, even if it was minimally touched by the spreading oil, to avoid a public health disaster from contaminated seafood. The good news is that about one-third of that closed off area has just been reopened by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In the 26,388 square miles to be reopened, no oil has been observed for the past thirty days. >> Read the Full Article
  • Galapagos Removed From Endangered List

    The Galapagos Islands have been removed from the UNESCO list of sites endangered by environmental threats or overuse. The island chain, about 620 miles off Ecuador's coast, is home to unique animal species that inspired Charles Darwin's ideas on evolution. >> Read the Full Article
  • What to do with the CO2

    Burning fuel releases a lot of carbon dioxide. For more is emitted than any other air emission. What can we do with it all? A basic reuse of carbon dioxide or CO2 is to have plants and trees use it to make new plants and trees. Recently, the U.S. government has been funding more than $100 million to six research projects that will turn carbon dioxide into fuel, plastics, cement and more. Though the US is spending some money even more comes from private investors. >> Read the Full Article
  • EPA to Study Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water; Seeks Public Input

    This July and August, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ("EPA") is holding a series of public meetings seeking input on the design for an upcoming study to assess the effect of hydraulic fracturing on public drinking water supplies. Hydraulic fracturing uses high-pressured water, combined with chemicals, to release natural gas present underground in shale formations. Use of this process has raised concerns across the country that this process will contaminate, or has contaminated, drinking water supplies. >> Read the Full Article
  • Climate bill in doubt as Democrats delay action

    U.S. Senate Democrats said on Thursday they will wait until September at the earliest to take up broad climate-change legislation, a potentially fatal blow to the White House push to curb greenhouse gases. The delay means Democrats have little time to advance the complex legislation amid intense political pressure in the weeks before November congressional elections. It also could derail global climate change initiatives, as the world's major economies and greenhouse gas emitters insist the United States play a leading role. >> Read the Full Article
  • Overpopulation is the Wrong Focus For Environmentalists

    A green myth is on the march. It wants to blame the world's over-breeding poor people for the planet's peril. It stinks. And on World Population Day, I encourage fellow environmentalists not to be seduced. The actor Jeremy Irons has announced that he plans to make an Al-Gore style movie about the population problem. The screen idol with a social conscience — who famously has seven homes and a pink castle in Ireland – says his inconvenient truth is that "there are just too many of us". Overpopulation is driving global warming, mass starvation and accumulating pollution, making the planet uninhabitable. Irons thinks a new plague, like the Black Death 700 years ago, is going to be nature's way of solving the problem. He is far from alone in thinking that all efforts to save the world are doomed unless we "do something" about continuing population growth. But this is nonsense. Worse, it is dangerous nonsense. >> Read the Full Article