• Cholera and Dengue Threaten Mexican Flood Victims

    VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico  - Tens of thousands of Mexicans forced into makeshift shelters by massive flooding are threatened by ailments ranging from colds to cholera, health officials said on Wednesday.  About 80,000 people from the flooded city of Villahermosa have taken refuge in crammed schools, churches and a multistory parking garage.   Colds, respiratory illnesses and foot fungus have become common, and doctors in the tropical city fear outbreaks of more serious diseases like cholera due to a lack of running water.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • Safety agency issues new batch of toy recalls

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - More recalls of lead-tainted toys made in China were announced on Wednesday by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, including 380,000 toy cars sold at Dollar General stores.

    Other warnings included smaller recalls of Dizzy Ducks music boxes, Winnie-the-Pooh spinning tops, "Big Red" wagons, Dragster and Funny Car toys, and Duck Family collectible wind-up toys, all because of paint with unsafe levels of lead.

    Millions of similar toy recalls, most involving Chinese-made products, have alarmed American consumers in recent months. Lead is toxic and can pose serious health risks to children, including brain damage.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • Ship Emissions Seen Causing 60,000 Deaths a Year

    BEIJING (Reuters) - Emissions from ocean-going ships are responsible for about 60,000 deaths a year from heart and lung-related cancers, according to research published on Wednesday that calls for tougher fuel standards.

    Shanghai, Singapore and Hong Kong, three of the world's five busiest ports, were likely to suffer disproportionate impacts from ship-related emissions, said the study, published in Environmental Science and Technology, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

    "For a long time there's been this perception that ship emissions are out there in the ocean and they don't really affect anyone on land and I think this study shows that this is clearly false," said David Marshall, senior counsel at the Boston-based Clean Air Task Force, which co-commissioned the study.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • Exposing Deadly Diseases in 3-D

    CHICAGO --- With 3-D and some very high tech arrays of technology, scientists are able to 'see' deadly bacteria and viruses in three dimensions, and in all liklihood, come to new understands of how they work, and what will stop their deadly work.

    The focus is the proteins of molecular sized killers. Scientists at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine are mapping parts of lethal bacteria in three dimensions, exposing a new and intimate chemical portrait of biological killers down to their atoms. This view of the disease will offer scientists who design drugs a fresh opening into the bacteria's vulnerabilities, and it's hoped, enable them to create drugs to disable it or vaccines to prevent it.  

     

    >> Read the Full Article
  • What's Killing the Bees?

    The author of this commentary is Paul J. Tukey, HGTV Co-Host & Executive Producer,  Publisher, named by People, Places & Plants magazine the 2006 COMMUNICATOR OF THE YEAR by the American Horticultural Society, the author of The Organic Lawn Care Manual, National Spokesperson and the co-founder of safelawns.org.

    60 Minutes is on the case. NPR recently published an expose. The media everywhere is scrambling for an angle on one of the most chilling and compelling questions of our time: what is killing the bees?

    And while it’s exciting to see all the attention on this subject — since bees’ pollination accounts for about one third of the food we consume daily — it’s also enormously frustrating for beekeepers when many of our media brethren stop just short of telling the beekeepers’ version of the story. >> Read the Full Article
  • Diesel fumes may increase heart attack, stroke threat

    ORLANDO, Florida (Reuters) - Inhaling diesel exhaust fumes causes changes in the body that may make people more prone to heart attack or stroke, researchers said on Tuesday.

    European scientists found that blood clots are more likely to form in otherwise healthy people exposed to relatively high amounts of diesel engine exhaust for a short time. This could cause a blocked vessel, heart attack or stroke.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • Zanzibar's impressive attack on malaria

    Research in Zanzibar, Tanzania has found a remarkable fall in the number of children dying from malaria. Within a three-year period (2002 to 2005), malaria deaths among the islands’ children dropped to a quarter of the previous level and overall child deaths to half. >> Read the Full Article
  • Study Shows Energy Drink “Cocktails” Lead to Increased Injury Risk

    College students who drink alcohol mixed with so-called “energy” drinks are at dramatically higher risk for injury and other alcohol-related consequences, compared to students who drink alcohol without energy drinks, according to new research from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. The findings were reported today at the annual meeting of the American Public Health Association in Washington, D.C. >> Read the Full Article
  • Yoga found to boost health in heart failure patients

    ORLANDO, Florida (Reuters) - An eight-week regimen of yoga proved safe for patients with chronic heart failure and helped reduce signs of inflammation often linked with death, according to a study released on Monday.

    More than 5 million Americans have chronic heart failure, a long-term condition in which the heart no longer pumps blood efficiently to the body's other organs. Health problems and deaths from the disease remain high despite widespread use of effective drug and device therapies to treat the condition.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • Swiss marijuana study raises questions, finds surprises

    CHICAGO (Reuters) - A study of more than 5,000 youngsters in Switzerland has found those who smoked marijuana do as well or better in some areas as those who don't, researchers said on Monday.

    But the same was not true for those who used both tobacco and marijuana, who tended to be heavier users of the drug, said the report from Dr. J.C. Suris and colleagues at the University of Lausanne.

    >> Read the Full Article