• New Option for Women with Advanced Breast Cancer Resistant to Hormone Therapy

    Treatment with the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib achieves a clinically meaningful improvement in overall survival in patients with hormone receptor positive (HR+) human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer that has relapsed or progressed on hormonal therapy, according to the final analysis of overall survival results from the PALOMA-3 study reported at ESMO 2018 (1).

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  • Poor Oral Health Linked to Higher Blood Pressure, Worse Blood Pressure Control

    People with high blood pressure taking medication for their condition are more likely to benefit from the therapy if they have good oral health, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

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  • Study: Dads Who Exercise Pass the Benefits to Their Children

    Most parents know that the diet and exercise habits of a pregnant woman impacts the health of her baby, but little is known about how a father’s health choices are passed to his children. A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds that lifestyle practices of fathers prior to conception may have a major impact on the lifelong health of their children.

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  • Adding Refined Fiber To Processed Food Could Have Negative Health Effects

    Adding highly refined fiber to processed foods could have negative effects on human health, such as promoting liver cancer, according to a new study by researchers at Georgia State University and the University of Toledo.

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  • Eating Leafy Greens Could Help Prevent Macular Degeneration

    A new study has shown that eating vegetable nitrates, found mainly in green leafy vegetables and beetroot, could help reduce your risk of developing early-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

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  • Why Some Cancers Affect Only Young Women

    Among several forms of pancreatic cancer, one of them affects specifically women, often young. How is this possible, even though the pancreas is an organ with little exposure to sex hormones? This pancreatic cancer, known as “mucinous cyst”, has strange similarities with another mucinous cancer, affecting the ovaries. By conducting large-scale analyses of genomic data, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and at the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG), Switzerland,  in collaboration with colleagues from the United States have provided an answer: both tumours originate from embryonic germ cells. While still undifferentiated, these cells migrate to the reproductive organs. On their way, some can mistakenly stop in other organs, bringing a risk of tumour that may occur 30 years later. By allowing a better classification of these mucinous tumours, this study, to be read in the Journal of Pathology, paves the way for a more appropriate and personalized management aligned with the tumour’s origin.

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  • People Who Commute through Natural Environments Daily Report Better Mental Health

    According to a new study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) —a centre supported by the ”la Caixa” Foundation—, people who commute through natural environments report better mental health. This is the main conclusion of a research based on questionnaires answered by nearly 3,600 participants from four European cities and published in Environment International.

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  • Polluted City Neighborhoods Are Bad News for Asthmatic Children

    Children with asthma who grow up in a New York City neighborhood where air pollution is prevalent need emergency medical treatment more often than asthmatics in less polluted areas. This is according to researchers from Columbia University in the US in a new study published in the Springer Nature-branded journal Pediatric Research. Lead author, Stephanie Lovinsky-Desir, warns however that neighborhoods where asthma cases in children are less common should not be excluded from efforts to improve air quality. This is because children that live in neighborhoods where asthma is less common may be more vulnerable to the effects of air pollution.

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  • How Technology and America’s Heartland Play Key Roles in a Healthy Seafood Diet

    Fish farming--or aquaculture--is a winning situation. It's a win for the economy, a win for the consumer, and a win for the planet.

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  • Environmental Factors May Trigger Onset of Multiple Sclerosis

    A new Tel Aviv University study finds that certain environmental conditions may precipitate structural changes that take place in myelin sheaths in the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS). Myelin sheaths are the "insulating tape" surrounding axons; axons carry electrical impulses in neurons.

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