Top Stories

Buyer beware: Some water-filter pitchers much better at toxin removal

Water pitchers designed to rid water of harmful contaminants are not created equal, new research has found.

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Climate change broadens threat of emerald ash borer

More Canadian cities will experience damage from the emerald ash borer than previously thought. As a result of climate change and fewer days of extreme cold, the beetle may eat its way further north than originally estimated.

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A new giant virus found in the waters off Oahu

A new, unusually large virus that infects common marine algae has been characterized by researchers at the Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa‘s School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology. Found in the coastal waters off Oʻahu, it contains the biggest genome ever sequenced for a virus infecting a photosynthetic organism.

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Using AI to help manage Canada’s invasive species

New University of Alberta research on managing aquatic invasive species in Canada combines the power of machine learning with expertise in biology and statistics to build a simple, easy-to-use tool for environmental managers.

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European Wind Energy Generation Potential in a 1.5˚C World

The UK and large parts of northern Europe could become windier if global temperatures reach 1.5˚C above pre-industrial levels, according to a new study.

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Keep Saying Yes to Fish Twice a Week for Heart Health

A new scientific advisory reaffirms the American Heart Association’s recommendation to eat fish- especially those rich in Omega-3 fatty acids twice a week to help reduce the risk of  heart failure, coronary heart disease, cardiac arrest and the most common type of stroke (ischemic). The advisory is published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

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Conservation Conundrum: Is Focusing on a Single Species a Good Strategy?

Conservationists often criticize state fish and game departments for focusing single-mindedly on one species to the detriment of everything else — for instance, improving habitat for elk, which then browse down habitat for songbirds. But what if conservationists — who don’t have that traditional hook-and-bullet mindset — nonetheless inadvertently do much the same thing?

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Climate-Threatened Animals Unable to Relocate

Many of the European mammals whose habitat is being destroyed by climate change are not able to find new places to live elsewhere.

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Marine Animals Have Been Following Their Preferred Climate for Millions of Years

Current global warming has far-reaching ecological consequences, also for the Earth’s oceans. Many marine organisms are reacting by migrating towards the poles. Researchers at Geozentrum Nordbayern at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that marine animals have been migrating for millions of years when the temperature on Earth increases or decreases (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/geb.12732).

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Emissions of an ozone-destroying chemical are rising again

Chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, were once considered a triumph of modern chemistry. Stable and versatile, these chemicals were used in hundreds of products, from military systems to the ubiquitous can of hairspray.

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