Top Stories

Halloween Crack

Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellite shows the evolution of two cracks in the Brunt ice shelf over the course of several years.

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Toll of Climate Change on Workers

Harvard economist says rise in number of very hot days will cut productivity and hike health risks, especially for many in blue-collar jobs.

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Revealing Interior Temperature of Antarctic Ice Sheet

As ESA’s SMOS satellite celebrates 10 years in orbit, yet another result has been added to its list of successes. This remarkable satellite mission has shown that it can be used to measure how the temperature of the Antarctic ice sheet changes with depth – and it’s much warmer deep down.

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Seismology in the Service of Peace

Twenty years ago, Switzerland ratified the Comprehensive Nuclear-​Test-Ban Treaty. This important agreement is based on a sophisticated network that makes it possible to monitor compliance with the treaty.

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Satellites Are Key to Monitoring Ocean Carbon

Satellites now play a key role in monitoring carbon levels in the oceans, but we are only just beginning to understand their full potential.

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UniSA Researchers a Step Closer to Reducing Childhood Lead Exposure by Amending the Soil

The link between Port Pirie’s lead smelter emissions and childhood health issues is well documented, but a new study reveals a possible solution for reducing childhood lead exposure – amending the soil.

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Food Waste in Tourism is a Bigger Issue Than Previously Thought

There are major gaps in how food waste in tourism is understood and calculated, according to researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Southern California.

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Oxygen in Old Rocks Reveals New Details of Its Own Early History on Earth

Despite bearing witness to its own increase in Earth's atmosphere by around 2.5 to 2.3 billion years ago, oxygen has had relatively little to say about its own early history until now.

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Researchers Can Now Quickly, Accurately Scan Produce For Nutrient Content

Texas A&M AgriLife scientists find fruitful applications of Raman spectroscopy in food production, from the field to the grocery store.

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Palu Landslides Linked to Rice Irrigation

Just downhill from the Gumbasa Aqueduct, farmers practice wet rice cultivation involving the purposeful flooding of fields. This flooding also raises the water table underground. The excess groundwater directly contributed to the 2018 landslides.

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