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Researchers discover higher environmental impact from cookstove emissions

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Cookstoves are a central part of millions of homes throughout Asia: families often use readily available and cheap biofuels — such as crop chaff or dung — to prepare the food needed to survive.

Cookstoves are a central part of millions of homes throughout Asia: families often use readily available and cheap biofuels — such as crop chaff or dung — to prepare the food needed to survive.

Previously, numerous research groups worldwide have shown, mostly based on laboratory experiments, smoke emitted from stoves used for both cooking and heating have a definite, detrimental environmental impact, particularly in India. Despite advances in technology, many people are reluctant or unable to adopt the newer, cleaner cookstoves. For several years, a collaborative team from Washington University in St. Louis has studied the issue and potential solutions. Now, new research gives them a clearer picture of the topic’s true scope.

“Our project findings quantitatively show that particulate emissions from cookstoves in India have been underestimated,” said Rajan Chakrabarty, assistant professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering at the School of Engineering & Applied Science.

Continue reading at Washington University in St. Louis

Image: Onewhohelps via English Wikinews