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Sat, Feb

Meat is not the "new tobacco," and shouldn't be taxed

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The idea of having to pay a sin tax for environmentally detrimental foods is gaining more support. For some, eating meat is a sin, and therefore meat products should be taxed like alcohol and tobacco.

A new report published recently by a British group called Farm Animal Investment Risk and Return Initiative (FAIRR) argues that a tax on meat is inevitable.

The idea of having to pay a sin tax for environmentally detrimental foods is gaining more support. For some, eating meat is a sin, and therefore meat products should be taxed like alcohol and tobacco.

A new report published recently by a British group called Farm Animal Investment Risk and Return Initiative (FAIRR) argues that a tax on meat is inevitable.

The meat industry, particularly beef producers, has been facing relentless criticism over the last decade. Very rarely have we seen reports encouraging consumers to eat more meat.

For one thing, science-based findings linking climate change and meat have been accumulating. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization has reported that livestock account for about 14.5 per cent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. Other surveys have suggested the sector may represent up to 18 per cent.

 

Continue reading at Dalhousie University.

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