• As Earth Day Arrives, Population Still the Uneasy Issue

    NEW ORLEANS-People walking around the Sheraton Hotel here are talking about population as if it were the most natural conversation in the world. The topic interests me, so I join in. As it happens, I've written a book on it, just published by Island Press, which I don't shrink from mentioning. Just being here, though, reminds me that human numbers aren't often talked about outside this hotel. >> Read the Full Article
  • Freshening of deep Antarctic waters worries experts

    SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Scientists studying the icy depths of the sea around Antarctica have detected changes in salinity that could have profound effects on the world's climate and ocean currents. The scientists returned to the southern Australian city of Hobart on Thursday after a one-month voyage studying the Southern Ocean to see how it is changing and what those changes might mean for global climate patterns. >> Read the Full Article
  • Turtles to be climate change canaries

    Just as canaries help miners monitor underground gases, marine turtles are emerging as excellent indicators of the effects of climate change. “Turtles are a really good way to study climate change because they depend on healthy beaches as well as mangroves, sea grass beds, coral reefs and deep ocean ecosystems to live”, said Dr. Lucy Hawkes, coordinator of an initiative to develop adaptation strategies for climate change impacts to turtles. >> Read the Full Article
  • Bush climate plan criticized for lacking urgency

    PARIS (Reuters) - The world needs tougher action to combat global warming than a plan by President George W. Bush to halt a rise in U.S. greenhouse gas emissions only by 2025, delegates at a climate conference in Paris said on Thursday. South Africa, one of 17 nations at the two-day global warming talks that started on Thursday, called Bush's proposals "disappointing" and unambitious when many other industrialized economies are already cutting emissions. >> Read the Full Article
  • GOING, GOING, GONE? New Satellite Images Reveal a Shrinking Amazon Rainforest

    Washington, D.C.- Deforestation of the Brazilian Amazon may be on the rise, according to high-resolution images released by an agency of the Brazilian government. The images suggest an end to a widely hailed three-year decline in the rate of deforestation and have spurred a public controversy among high-level Brazilian officials, writes Tim Hirsch, author of "The Incredible Shrinking Amazon Rainforest" in the May/June 2008 issue of World Watch magazine. >> Read the Full Article
  • Current Major Flooding in U.S. a Sign of Things to Come

    Major floods striking America’s heartland this week offer a preview of the spring seasonal outlook, according to NOAA’s National Weather Service. Several factors will contribute to above-average flood conditions, including record rainfall in some states and snow packs, which are melting and causing rivers and streams to crest over their banks. This week, more than 250 communities in a dozen states are experiencing flood conditions. The science supporting NOAA’s short-term forecasts allows for a high level of certainty. National Weather Service forecasters highlighted potential for the current major flood event a week in advance and began working with emergency managers to prepare local communities for the impending danger. >> Read the Full Article
  • New Kyoto should focus on industry sectors: Mimura

    TOKYO (Reuters) - Greenhouse gas curbs on industries such as power generation and steel could provide a basis for a renewed U.N.-led drive to fight global warming, Akio Mimura, Chairman of Nippon Steel Corp said on Thursday. Japan hosts the G8 summit meeting of political leaders at the Lake Toya resort area of Hokkaido in July, which is expected to discuss a new United Nations climate treaty to succeed the Kyoto Protocol, which ends in 2012. >> Read the Full Article
  • Forests' long-term potential for carbon offsetting

    As well as cutting our fossil fuel emissions, planting new forests, or managing existing forests or agricultural land more effectively can capitalise on nature’s ability to act as a carbon sink. Research published online in the open access journal Carbon Balance and Management shows that although planting trees alone is unlikely to solve our climate problems, large-scale plantations could have a significant effect in the longer term. >> Read the Full Article
  • Report: Bush considers backing global warming plan

    It is probably an overstatement to characterize the conservative Washington Times newspaper as the Bush Administration’s Pravda, but the paper often has seemed a lot closer to the President than many other news organs, and even has been suspected of being a launching pad for trial balloons. >> Read the Full Article
  • Bangladesh faces climate change refugee nightmare

    DHAKA (Reuters) - Abdul Majid has been forced to move 22 times in as many years, a victim of the annual floods that ravage Bangladesh. There are millions like Majid, 65, in Bangladesh and in the future there could be many millions more if scientists' predictions of rising seas and more intense droughts and storms come true. >> Read the Full Article