• Impact of Arctic heat wave stuns climate change researchers

    Unprecedented warm temperatures in the High Arctic this past summer were so extreme that researchers with a Queen’s-led climate change project have begun revising their forecasts.

    “Everything has changed dramatically in the watershed we observed,” reports Geography professor Scott Lamoureux, the leader of an International Polar Year project announced yesterday in Nunavut by Indian and Northern Affairs Minister Chuck Strahl. “It’s something we’d envisioned for the future – but to see it happening now is quite remarkable.”

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  • Gaia Guru Urges Ocean Pipes To Fix Earth's Climate

    LONDON  - A series of giant pipes in the oceans to mix surface and deeper water could be an emergency fix for the Earth's damaged climate system, the scientist behind the Gaia theory said on Wednesday. >> Read the Full Article
  • EU Struggles To Walk Its Talk On Climate Change

    UNITED NATIONS - The European Union pressed world leaders this week to follow its lead in fighting climate change, but a battle looms at home over how to share the burden of cutting greenhouse gas emissions.  The EU in March agreed to cut emissions blamed for global warming by 20 percent by 2020 compared to 1990 levels and 30 percent if the rest of the world joins in.   European leaders such as German Chancellor Angela Merkel urged their counterparts at the United Nations to follow suit.

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  • U.S. Climate Talks Draw World's Biggest Polluters

    WASHINGTON  - The world's biggest greenhouse gas polluters -- including the United States and China -- sent envoys to the U.S. State Department on Thursday for discussions on climate change and what to do about it.  The two-day meeting was called by President George W. Bush, whose administration has been criticized for its refusal to adopt mandatory limits for climate-warming emissions. The White House favors "aspirational" targets.

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  • Survey: US Businesses Conflicted About Adopting Climate Change Practices

     NEW YORK - While U.S. businesses are concerned about compliance costs related to climate change legislation, those same companies still believe that the federal government should be doing more to combat global warming, according to a new survey. The survey was sponsored by a San Francisco law firm, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw and Pittman.
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  • North America's northernmost lake affected by global warming

    Analyses conducted by researchers from Université Laval’s Center for Northern Studies reveal that the continent’s northernmost lake is affected by climate change. In an article to be published in the September 28 edition of Geophysical Research Letters, the international research team led by Université Laval scientists Warwick Vincent and Reinhard Pienitz reports that aquatic life in Ward Hunt Lake, a body of water located on a small island north of Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic, has undergone major transformations within the last two centuries. The speed and range of these transformations—unprecedented in the lake’s last 8,000 years—suggest that climate change related to human activity could be at the source of this phenomenon. >> Read the Full Article
  • Clinton Global Initiative Begins

    Across town from the United Nations General Assembly session, other world leaders, celebrities and scholars gathered Wednesday for the third annual Clinton Global Initiative conference to discuss subjects of global importance. >> Read the Full Article
  • Storms pose no risk to U.S. oil rigs in Mexico Gulf: NHC

    Despite a tropical storm and a tropical depression spinning in the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico, no storms currently threaten the U.S. oil and natural gas production in the northern Gulf of Mexico, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said Wednesday.

    Tropical Depression 13, however, could disrupt operations in the Cantarell Complex of Mexican oil fields beneath the Bay of Campeche in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico.

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  • World Energy Revolution Needed For Climate, Says Condoleezza Rice

    UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said on Monday the world needs a revolution on energy that transcends oil, gas and coal to prevent problems from climate change.

    "Ultimately, we must develop and bring to market new energy technologies that transcend the current system of fossil fuels, carbon emissions and economic activity. Put simply, the world needs a technological revolution," Rice told delegates at a special U.N. conference on climate change.

    A landmark report by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change this year said human activities such as burning fossil fuels and forests are very likely causing climate change that will lead to more deadly storms, heat waves, droughts and floods.

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  • World energy revolution needed for climate: U.S.

    U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said on Monday the world needs a revolution on energy that transcends oil, gas and coal to prevent problems from climate change."Ultimately, we must develop and bring to market new energy technologies that transcend the current system of fossil fuels, carbon emissions and economic activity. Put simply, the world needs a technological revolution," Rice told delegates at a special U.N. conference on climate change. >> Read the Full Article