• Wildfires rage in southern California

    LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - At least nine wildfires stoked by gusting winds burned out of control in southern California on Sunday, killing one person in San Diego and forcing hundreds to evacuate the wealthy enclave of Malibu where five homes went up in flames.

    The Malibu fire burned 1,250 acres by 4:30 p.m. and destroyed at least seven buildings, including a landmark castle-like house and a Presbyterian church, officials said. No injuries were reported.

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  • California To Sue EPA next week on Carmaker Emissions Waiver

    LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - California will sue the Environmental Protection Agency next week in the state's bid to crack down on greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles, a spokesman for Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said on Saturday.

    California will file a lawsuit against the EPA demanding the right to set its own limits on vehicle emissions that are stricter than national standards, spokesman Aaron McLear said.

    California, which has become a leader on environmental issues in the United States, passed a state law in 2005 that would require new vehicles to meet progressively tighter standards for greenhouse gas emissions starting with 2009 models.

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  • U.N. climate chief looks for Bali breakthrough

    Global warming talks in Bali in December need to make a breakthrough or international efforts to limit greenhouse gases could be in "deep trouble," the top U.N. climate official said on Friday.

    "If we're not on the eve of a breakthrough in Bali, we can spend the next six years waiting for the next report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, public interest will slip away and we will be in deep trouble," said Yvo de Boer, who heads the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

     

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  • La Nina onset expected in November

    The National Weather Service on Thursday predicted the arrival of the weather anomaly La Nina in November, after conditions strengthened in recent months. >> Read the Full Article
  • Bleak "report card" finds warming Arctic

    A bleak "report card" on global warming's Arctic impact released on Wednesday found less ice, hotter air and dying wildlife, and stressed that what happens around the North Pole affects the entire planet.

    The report, issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, also found that weird winds blowing warm air toward the North Pole and unusually persistent sunshine added to the warming trend.

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  • Bleak U.S. "report card" finds warming Arctic

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A bleak "report card" on global warming's Arctic impact released on Wednesday found less ice, hotter air and dying wildlife, and stressed that what happens around the North Pole affects the entire planet.

    The report, issued by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, also found that weird winds blowing warm air toward the North Pole and unusually persistent sunshine added to the warming trend.

    Unlike previous years, when there have been hot spots and cold spots at different times in the Arctic, "winter and spring, the temperatures are all above average throughout the whole Arctic and all at the same time," said James Overland of NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle.

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  • Amazon loggers hold activists captive

    BRASILIA (Reuters) - Brazilian loggers besieged eight Greenpeace activists on Wednesday in a remote Amazon town, angered by a campaign against global warming that they fear could hurt their image, the conservation group said.

    Hundreds of townspeople, including dozens of loggers in trucks, cars and motorcycles, blockaded the activists in a local branch of the government's environmental protection agency Ibama, a Greenpeace spokesman said.

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  • Hidden Costs of Climate Change: Major, Nationwide, Uncounted

    The total economic cost of climate change in the United States will be major and nationwide in scope, but remains uncounted, unplanned for and largely hidden in public debate, says a new study from the University of Maryland. The report, The U.S. Economic Impacts of Climate Change and the Costs of Inaction, is the first to pull together and analyze the previous economic research on the subject, along with other relevant data, in order to develop a more complete estimate of costs.

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  • Climate-change Clues From Wisconsin's Lakes

    Madison, Wisconsin - As part of the world carbon cycle, bacterial communities in freshwater lakes break down carbon in decaying organic matter, converting it into carbon dioxide that is released into the atmosphere.

    However, in humic lakes — darkly stained, bog-rimmed bodies of water that contain high levels of decaying organic matter — this process creates even higher carbon-dioxide emission levels. "There's a lot of concern that, as the climate changes, more carbon will be turned into carbon dioxide in these kinds of lakes," says Katherine McMahon, a University of Wisconsin-Madison assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering.
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  • China launches Effort To Green Inner Mongolian Desert

    Bejing, China - Beijing and Seoul recently signed an agreement to launch a joint program to harness China's eighth-largest desert - the Ulan Buh in North China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.

    About 15 million yuan (1.99 million U.S. dollars) will be spent growing trees and building greenhouses to prevent environmental deterioration in the Ulan Buh region, according to officials involved in the project.
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