• Tea drinking may not curb ovarian cancer risk

    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Tea drinking, in general, does not appear to decrease the risk for ovarian cancer, according to combined data from nine studies. But in one of these studies, conducted in China where the majority of tea drinkers drink green tea, Dr. Bin Wang and colleagues noted a downward trend for ovarian cancer risk in conjunction with an increased duration of tea drinking. >> Read the Full Article
  • Chronic tummy aches common in young teens

    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - One in five children will develop chronic abdominal pain during adolescence, according to a new study in English schoolchildren. The problem was more common in girls, with one-third reporting persistent stomach pain, compared to 13 percent of boys, Dr. A. El-Metwally of the University of Aberdeen in Scotland and colleagues found, but the reasons for the gender difference remain unclear. >> Read the Full Article
  • Nigeria court seeks 3 arrests in Pfizer drug trial

    KANO, Nigeria (Reuters) - A Nigerian court on Monday ordered the arrests of three of the defendants in a trial over a drug test conducted by Pfizer in 1996 which Nigerian authorities say killed 11 children and left others disabled. The northern state of Kano is suing Pfizer for $2 billion in damages and pressing criminal charges over the testing of the antibiotic Trovan on children in Kano during a meningitis epidemic that killed 12,000 children in six months. >> Read the Full Article
  • Anti-alcohol drug promising for binge eaters

    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The results of a small study suggest that the muscle-relaxing drug baclofen may help curb binge eating episodes in women with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. "This is the first study, to our knowledge, that studies baclofen's use in binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa in a systematic manner," Dr. Allegra I. Broft, from Columbia University in New York, who led the study, told Reuters Health. >> Read the Full Article
  • Coffee, tea linked to lower risk of kidney cancer

    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Coffee and tea lovers may have a slightly reduced risk of developing kidney cancer, research hints. The findings, based on an analysis of 13 previous studies, suggest that coffee and tea may be protective against kidney cancer, while milk, soda and juice seem to have no effect one way or the other. >> Read the Full Article
  • Survey: Coal-Fired Power Plant Freeze Favored

    DES MOINES, Iowa - Sending a clear message to state officials and presidential candidates, nearly four out of five Iowans (79 percent) -- including 69 percent of Republicans, 86 percent of Democrats and 79 percent of Independents -- think that "Iowa should focus on increased (energy) conservation steps and more fuel efficiency to reduce demand for electricity before it constructs new coal-fired power plants," according to a major new Opinion Research Corporation (ORC) survey commissioned by Iowa Interfaith Power & Light, Iowa Farmers Union and Plains Justice. >> Read the Full Article
  • U.S. company recalls green beans over bacteria risk

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A Michigan company said on Friday it was voluntarily recalling 1,026 cans of green beans because they may be contaminated with bacteria that cause botulism, a life-threatening illness. New Era Canning Company said it was recalling 171 cases of GFS Fancy Blue Lake Cut Green Beans with the lot code 19H7FL. Each case contained six cans in 6-pound, 5-ounce sizes. >> Read the Full Article
  • Beef from Safeway may have had salmonella: USDA

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Agriculture Department said fresh ground beef products contaminated with multi-drug resistant Salmonella may have been ground and later sold at Safeway Inc stores in five states. USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service said the products were sold at supermarket chain Safeway Inc in Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada and New Mexico between September 19 and November 5, 2007. "This alert is being issued after an exhaustive and continuing investigation whereby FSIS could not identify specific establishments, lots and products that would be subject to a recall," the agency said. "FSIS has no reason to believe that these products are still available for sale in commerce," it said. >> Read the Full Article
  • U.S. issues new warning on misuse of J&J pain patch

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. health officials issued the second warning since 2005 on Friday about deaths from misuse of Johnson & Johnson's Duragesic pain-killing patch or generic versions. Despite a July 2005 warning, the Food and Drug Administration "has continued to receive reports of deaths and life-threatening side effects after doctors have inappropriately prescribed the patch or patients have incorrectly used it," the agency said. >> Read the Full Article
  • GM recalls 275,936 vehicles

    DETROIT (Reuters) - General Motors Corp said on Friday it is recalling 275,936 Cadillacs, Pontiacs and Saturms sold in the United States because of a fluid leak that could lead to loss of control of the vehicle. The recall involves vehicles 2005-2007 model year Cadillac CTS, CTS-V and STS, STS-V sedans, 2005-2007 model year Cadillac SRX crossovers, and 2006-2007 model year Pontiac Solstice and the 2007 Saturn Sky. GM spokeswoman Carolyn Markey said the seal on the rear axle pinion, which provides power to the rear wheels, could leak fluid, causing the wheels to seize and lock. >> Read the Full Article