• Biofuels worsen Hungary's drought, expert says

    Biofuel production and burning agricultural by-products in power plants contributed to Hungary's severe drought this year, an academic expert said on Thursday. >> Read the Full Article
  • Wal-Mart selling own brand of energy efficient compact fluorescent lightbulbs

    Wal-Mart Stores Inc said on Thursday that it has launched its own private label of compact fluorescent lightbulbs and is now selling the "Great Value" energy efficient bulbs in more than 3,000 stores. >> Read the Full Article
  • Arctic vault takes shape for world food crops

    In a cavern under a remote Arctic mountain, Norway will soon begin squirreling away the world's crop seeds in case of disaster.

    Dynamited out of a mountainside on Spitsbergen island around 1,000 km (600 miles) from the North Pole, the store has been called a doomsday vault or a Noah's Ark of the plant kingdom.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • New twist on time-tested technology: Heat Pumps.

    To be realistic, it’s hard to imagine every home, apartment building or condominium complex in the world converting to solar energy for heat, hot water and electricity (or any other onsite renewable energy for that matter). Further, given the low proportion of renewables currently on the world’s power grids, it’s hard to see every building on the planet powered by renewables for quite some time. >> Read the Full Article
  • Using video-game technology to find oil & gas

    What do video games and seismic explorations have in common" Both require very demanding computer applications that call for the ability to process massive quantities of data rapidly. Using computer technology originally co-designed by IBM for video-game consoles, University of Houston seismic researchers are employing this extremely fast technology to more effectively target oil reserves. >> Read the Full Article
  • Australia uses lasers to check Antarctic sea ice

    An Australian-led expedition is using lasers on helicopters in Antarctica and satellites for the first time to determine whether sea ice in the Southern Ocean is changing in response to climate change.There are concerns that Antarctic sea ice might be getting thinner, the Australian Antarctic Division said in a statement on Thursday. >> Read the Full Article
  • Must Watch TV: Ultimate Green Machines

    LOS ANGELES - From a Maseriati Quattroporte to a '57 Chevy pick-up, all the way to a Cigarette style speedboat, the new TV show "Ultimate Green Machines" will show that any vehicle can still run as fast if not faster than their stock counterparts while being green inside and out. For the series, the producers have assembled a dream team of "off-the-grid", defiant-minded mechanics and fabricators. This team not only thinks outside the box, they are ready to tear it up on the open road and do it green. The production team will also be producing a second show called "Finding Green", an equally intense, following a man with a burning passion and a need to meet a deadline imposed by his multi-million dollar investor. Cameras follow his every move along this often rocky road, as the clock ticks away on his dream.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • Eco-Engineering, Learned From A Steam-Spitting Beetle

    Leeds, UK - An amazing insect, which sprays its predators with toxic steam, has inspired research into a new generation of technology at the University of Leeds.

    The research has resulted in the new µMist™ technology which has the potential to become the platform for the next generation of more effective and eco-friendly mist carrier systems. It has multiple potential applications – such as new nebulisers, needle-free injections, fire extinguishers and powerful fuel injection systems – all more efficient and environmentally-friendly than existing technologies.

    The research funded initially by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, and subsequently by Swedish Biomimetics 3000 ®, enabled the Leeds team, led by Professor of Thermodynamics and Combustion Theory Andy McIntosh to examine the mechanisms at work in the bombardier beetle.

     

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  • Lonliness, A Molecule

    It is already known that a person's social environment can affect his or her health, with those who are socially isolated - that is, lonely - suffering from higher mortality than people who are not.

    Now, in the first study of its kind, published in the current issue of the journal Genome Biology, UCLA researchers have identified a distinct pattern of gene expression in immune cells from people who experience chronically high levels of loneliness. The findings suggest that feelings of social isolation are linked to alterations in the activity of genes that drive inflammation, the first response of the immune system. The study provides a molecular framework for understanding why social factors are linked to an increased risk of heart disease, viral infections and cancer.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • Scientists in first global study of 'poison' gas in the atmosphere

    It was used as a chemical weapon in the trenches in the First World War, but nearly a century later, new research by an international team of scientists has discovered that phosgene is present in significant quantities in the atmosphere. >> Read the Full Article