• Tropical depression Forms In Gulf

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Subtropical Depression 10 in the Gulf of Mexico strengthened Friday into a tropical depression, the National Hurricane Center said in a report.

    The NHC said the center of the depression was located about 50 miles southwest of Apalachicola, Florida, and about 155 miles east-southeast of Mobile, Alabama.

    The depression, which is packing winds near 35 miles per hour, was moving toward the northwest near 11 mph. The NHC in a report at 2 p.m. EDT (1800 GMT) predicted the storm would turn to the west-northwest during the next 24 hours.

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  • La Nina may impact global weather into 2008

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The weather anomaly La Nina could influence global weather patterns through the early part of 2008, according to the National Weather Service.

    The U.S. agency said La Nina conditions have developed across the equatorial Pacific Ocean during the past few months, though some forecasting models have predicted a more rapid development than has occurred.

    La Nina, which means "little girl" in Spanish, is an unusual cooling of Pacific Ocean surface temperatures and can trigger widespread changes in weather around the world, including a higher-than-normal number of hurricanes in the Atlantic.

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  • Arctic Ice Ebbs To Record Level: Scientists

    WASHINGTON - Arctic sea ice melted to its lowest level ever this week, shattering a record set in 2005 and continuing a trend spurred by human-caused global warming, scientists said on Thursday.  "It's the biggest drop from a previous record that we've ever had and it's really quite astounding," said Walt Meier, a research scientist at the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center in Colorado.

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  • Developing Nation Splits May Hinder Climate Talks

    LONDON - Talks on global warming in the United States next week may be complicated by differences among developing countries as their climate policy positions diverge.  All agree that the rich should take a lead in tackling climate change after enjoying more than two centuries of economic growth fuelled by burning coal and oil.  The differences will emerge on when and under what terms developing nations shoulder a greater burden in cutting their own growing greenhouse gas emissions.

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  • Ancient British Bog May Hold Climate Change Clues

    LONDON (Reuters) - An ancient British bog that pumped out high amounts of greenhouse gases during a period of global warming 55 million years ago may offer clues about future climate change, researchers said on Wednesday.

    An analysis of sediments from the bog suggests that global warming caused methane emissions to rise in the wetlands, which in turn sent temperatures there even higher, the researchers said.

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  • Evacuation Order Lifted for Calif. Fire

    Authorities lifted an evacuation order for this mountaintop community as crews came close to snuffing out a wildfire that scorched more than 14,000 acres in the San Bernardino National Forest. >> Read the Full Article
  • Indonesia's Sumatra hit by 6.7 quake, no tsunami

    An undersea earthquake measuring 6.7 on the Richter scale jolted West Sumatra on Thursday, striking in the same area as last week's powerful tremor, Indonesia's meteorology agency said. >> Read the Full Article
  • Coca Cola and Greenpeace - Cooling the Beijing Olympics

    Guess what? There is another big global warming problem — and we're tackling it in a BIG way! It's the chemical gases that make your air conditioner and refrigerator cool, trapping heat and removing it from your beer or your bedroom.  Ironically, these gases, called HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons), also do a really good job of trapping heat in the atmosphere contributing to global warming, when they eventually leak out of your car, your old fridge or air conditioner. >> Read the Full Article
  • Scientist warns of climate change impact

    Climate change could mean higher temperatures, less winter precipitation and less spring runoff for the Southwest, a climatologist says. >> Read the Full Article
  • Scientists in first global study of 'poison' gas in the atmosphere

    It was used as a chemical weapon in the trenches in the First World War, but nearly a century later, new research by an international team of scientists has discovered that phosgene is present in significant quantities in the atmosphere. >> Read the Full Article