• Tropical Depression Could Form In Atlantic

    NEW YORK - A tropical wave in the central Atlantic Ocean was a little better-defined early Thursday and could become the sixth tropical depression of the season in the next day or two, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said in its morning advisory. A tropical depression is a tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained wind speed is 38 mph or less. >> Read the Full Article
  • NASA Study Predicts More Severe Storms With Global Warming

    NASA scientists have developed a new climate model that indicates that the most violent severe storms and tornadoes may become more common as Earth’s climate warms. >> Read the Full Article
  • China Warns: Rising Seas Will "Engulf" Tract Of Pearl River Delta

    BEIJING - A huge swathe of China's booming Pearl River Delta will be "engulfed" by rising sea water by the middle of the century because of global warming, state media said on Thursday, quoting weather officials. Some 1,153 square km (445 square miles) of coastal land would be flooded by 2050, with the bustling cities of Guangzhou, capital of Guangdong province, Zhuhai and Foshan the worst affected, the China Daily said, quoting the provincial water authority. >> Read the Full Article
  • New U.S. Test: CO2 Could Make Grasslands 'Unusable'

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels could change the nature of grasslands and decrease their usefulness as grazing pastures, say researchers. The study was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week (27 August). If carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere continue to rise, important grazing areas in parts of Africa, Kazakhstan, Mexico, Mongolia, and southern and South East Asia could be under threat, according to lead author Jack Morgan, a plant physiologist from the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service. >> Read the Full Article
  • Study: Experts’ Forecasts Sometimes Fall Short

    A study about predicting the outcome of actual conflicts found that the forecasts of experts who use their unaided judgment are little better than those of novices, according to a new study in a publication of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences. When presented with actual crises, such as a disguised version of a 1970s border dispute between Iraq and Syria and an unfolding dispute between football players and management, experts were able to forecast the decisions the parties made in only 32% of the cases, little better than the 29% scored by undergraduate students. Chance guesses at the outcomes would be right 28% of the time. >> Read the Full Article
  • Sea to "Engulf" Tract of China's Pearl River Delta

    A huge swathe of China's booming Pearl River Delta will be "engulfed" by rising sea water by the middle of the century because of global warming, state media said on Thursday, quoting weather officials. >> Read the Full Article
  • Striking Back: Lightning In The Developing World

    Scientists are battling to stop damage and death caused by lightning strikes in the developing world. In July this year, dark clouds and lightning stained the sky above Ushari Dara, a remote mountain village in northwestern Pakistan. After the storm had blown over, police reported that lightning had destroyed a dozen houses and killed up to 30 people. >> Read the Full Article
  • FACTBOX-Draft U.N. study shows climate risks and solutions

    Following are highlights of a draft 21-page U.N. report summing up global warming research by 2,500 scientists this year. The report, obtained by Reuters and giving an overview of 3,000 pages of previously published documents by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, will be issued in November in Spain after review by governments. >> Read the Full Article
  • Mankind to blame for warming but can slow damage

    Mankind is to blame for climate change but governments still have time to slow accelerating damage at moderate cost if they act quickly, a draft U.N. report shows. Underlining the need for speed, it says a European Union goal of holding temperature rises to a maximum 2 Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times is almost out of reach. The 21-page study, due for release in November, lays out possible responses to global warming but cautions that some impacts are already inevitable, such as a gradual rise in sea levels that is set to last for centuries. >> Read the Full Article
  • Mankind to Blame for Warming but Can Slow Damage, UN Says

    Mankind is to blame for climate change but governments still have time to slow accelerating damage at moderate cost if they act quickly, a draft U.N. report shows. Underlining the need for speed, it says a European Union goal of holding temperature rises to a maximum 2 Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times is almost out of reach. >> Read the Full Article