• Namibia's poor 'will be hit hard' by climate change

    Namibia, Africa - Climate change is expected to dramatically alter the lifestyles of poor people in Namibia, say the authors of a study. Their findings were published by the UK-based International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) this month (December).

    Namibia is economically dependent on natural resources. Up to 30 per cent of its gross domestic product (GDP) is estimated to be reliant on the environment. Climate change could increase temperatures by 2–6 degrees Celsius by 2100, and rainfall is expected to be lower and more variable.

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  • China and Mexico team up to fight wheat disease

    MEXICO CITY - Two agricultural research organisations have agreed to collaborate on research to combat wheat diseases and develop climate change-resistant wheat varieties using traditional methods of breeding.The agreement, between the Mexico-based International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) and the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, was signed last week. >> Read the Full Article
  • Managing manure in California

     

    Merced, California -  A partnership between agricultural leaders and UC Merced aims to help California farmers maintain the environment and the economy.

    California is the nation's leading dairy state, generating $5.2 billion in milk and cream sales a year. While that keeps the state's 1.7 million dairy cows busy making milk, they also produce plenty of manure. The manure is filled with nutrients that farmers can use as fertilizer, but it also can pollute the environment.

     

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  • China takes U.S. to task on currency, food safety

    XIANGHE, China (Reuters) - An assertive China fended off U.S. pressure over currency policy and food safety on Wednesday and told Washington to put its own house in order rather than blame Beijing for its economic problems.

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  • Australia's PM hands over Kyoto papers in Bali

    NUSA DUA, Indonesia (Reuters) - Australia's new prime minister handed over documents ratifying the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations in Bali on Wednesday and said his own country was already suffering from global warming.

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  • Shell seeks to make diesel fuel from algae

    LONDON (Reuters) - Royal Dutch Shell is to fund a project that aims to produce transport fuel from algae, as biofuel production from palm oil and crops are increasingly criticized for causing deforestation and higher food prices.

    Oil major Shell said on Tuesday it would build a pilot facility in Hawaii to grow marine algae from which it would extract vegetable oil that would be converted into a form of diesel for use in trucks and cars.

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  • Researchers combat slowing yields with targeted fertilizer applications

    MADISON, WI, DECEMBER 10, 2007– Scientists at Punjab Agricultural University, the International Rice Research Institute, and Virginia Tech have been successful in increasing average rice yields in northwest India using site-specific nutrient management strategies. >> Read the Full Article
  • Nobel winners say science must transcend borders

    STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Scientists must break through the boundaries between disciplines and nations to find solutions to some of the great unanswered questions, some of 2007's Nobel prize winners said on Friday.

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  • China market may be breeding ground for deadly viruses

    GUANGZHOU, China (Reuters) - Scorpions scamper in bowls, water snakes coil in tanks and cats whine in cramped cages, waiting to be slaughtered, skinned and served for dinner.

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  • French farmer to go on anti-GMO hunger strike

    Speaking at the Millau Court of Justice in southern France, where his four-month jail sentence for trashing a GMO field in 2004 was commuted to a fine, Bove said he would start his unlimited strike on January 3, along with 10 to 15 other activists.

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