• Mainstream Renewable Energy Continues Double-digit Growth

    In less than a decade since the Kyoto Protocol was adopted, renewable energy has evolved rapidly from an 'alternative' source of energy to a mainstream energy option, according to the REN21 Renewables Global Status Report 2007.

    Compared to a total global power capacity of 4,300 GW, the report finds renewable energy (without large hydro) now provides about 240 Gigawatts (GW) of clean power, avoiding some 5 gigatonnes per year (Gt/year) of carbon emissions.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • U.S. pork workers develop mysterous neorological condition

    CHICAGO (Reuters) - Eleven workers who removed brains from slaughtered pigs at a plant in Minnesota have come down with a mysterious neurological condition, company and U.S. health officials said on Friday.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • Senators ask Bush for greater food safety funding

    "Additional funding for (the Food and Drug Administration) is an important step toward improving our ability to protect human health and welfare," 23 senators from both parties wrote in the letter, also directed to budget director Jim Nussle.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • Benin finds two bird flu outbreaks, suspects H5N1

    COTONOU (Reuters) - Benin has discovered two outbreaks of bird flu among poultry which it believes to be the deadly H5N1 strain, the first such cases in the West African country, a senior health official said on Friday.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • Kenya issues alert over desert locust invasion

    NAIROBI (Reuters) - Desert locusts have invaded Kenya's arid northeastern region, threatening maize and wheat crops, but the Agriculture Ministry said on Friday it was well prepared to fight the pests.

    The desert locust's destructive power stems from its gregarious nature that allows it to move in swarms, eating whatever vegetation it finds in its path.

    A ministry statement published in local newspapers said the locusts were not aggressively feeding yet, but were in their last stage of development and laying eggs in the moist sandy soil of the hot region.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • France suspends commercial GMO seed use, studies safety

    PARIS (Reuters) - France formally suspended on Thursday the commercial use of genetically modified (GMO) seeds in the country until early February and ordered a biotech safety study.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • Germany ends ban on Monsanto GMO maize type

    Germany had in May this year imposed a temporary ban on commercial sales of MON810 citing concerns about safety of the maize (corn), which is resistant to several types of butterflies which are pests to the grain in Europe.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • A Fishy Definition of Organic

    As one of the busiest of all times for food professionals, the holiday season will make us work hard to put our best spatula forward.

    And to keep our competitive edge, we depend on the freshest and healthiest ingredients available to keep our guests coming back for seconds.

    >> Read the Full Article
  • Polluting Pulp Mill Draws Protest and Spurs World Court Case

    Environmentalists from Argentina are continuing their more than two-year protest of an Uruguayan pulp mill along a river that separates the two countries. Protesters say the cellulose processing plant, which went into operation on November 9, will release pollutants into the Uruguay River and threaten local ecosystems and human health. Argentine authorities claim that the mill violates a bilateral treaty and have taken the issue to the International Court of Justice in The Hague, The Netherlands. >> Read the Full Article
  • Broccoli compound may ameliorate skin disease

    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The natural compound sulforaphane, which is abundant in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables, may have a role in the treatment of epidermolysis bullosa simplex, according to research presented during the annual meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology in Washington, DC.

    Epidermolysis bullosa simplex is a genetic condition that causes the skin to become fragile and blister easily from minor injuries or friction, such as rubbing or scratching. The signs and symptoms of the condition vary widely -- blistering may primarily affect the hands and feet and heals, while severe cases involve widespread blistering that can lead to infection, dehydration and may be life-threatening in infants.

    >> Read the Full Article