• Not ALL Conservatives Doubt Climate Change

    Republican Bob Inglis’ statement that he believed in human-caused climate change helped cost him his seat in Congress. In a Yale Environment 360 interview, Inglis explains why he is now trying to persuade his fellow conservatives that their principles can help save the planet. Heresy may have cost Bob Inglis his seat in the U.S. Congress. As a six-term Republican congressman from one of South Carolina’s most conservative districts, Inglis told an audience at a 2010 campaign event that he believed in human-caused climate change. The fallout from that comment helped ensure his defeat by a Tea Party-backed candidate. >> Read the Full Article
  • Is cloud seeding preventing further flooding in Indonesia?

    Indonesia is banking on an unusual strategy to prevent further flooding in its inundated capital Jakarta, and officials claim that they are already seeing positive results. They are using cloud seeding — a weather modification technology often resorted to during drought. The method involves injecting clouds with substances that encourage the formation of ice crystals heavy enough to fall, thereby speeding up the production of rain. >> Read the Full Article
  • NASA Develops Aircraft Design that Uses 50 Percent Less Fuel

    It seems like new, innovative technologies to reduce our carbon footprint are always 10 years away. It's hard to imagine there won't be another amazing technology just around the corner. In this case, NASA has developed a manufacturing method for wing-shaped aircraft. When combined with an uber-efficient jet engine called an "ultra-high bypass ratio engine", this new design promises to cut fuel consumptions by half. >> Read the Full Article
  • Poll Reveals American Attitude Towards Climate Change, Support for Clean Energy

    Whether you believe climate change is occurring or not, according to a Duke University poll, the percentage of Americans who think climate change is occurring has reached its highest level since 2007. In recent years, the climate change debate has been a hot topic not only among scientists and experts in the field, but among political party lines. >> Read the Full Article
  • Arctic Slumping

    Each spring in the Arctic, the flooding triggered by melting snow which washes vast amounts of carbon-rich soil from the land into the streams and ocean which is a process called slumping. This may not sound like much. Certainly it is localized erosion, but global warming? That's of particular interest to scientists studying global warming, because in those waters much of the carbon that's being released from melting permafrost is oxidized by bacteria into carbon dioxide, says Rose Cory, an environmental scientist at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Carbon from surface waters amounts to as much as 40% of the total carbon that ultimately gets transferred from the Arctic to the atmosphere, she says. >> Read the Full Article
  • Wildflowers at risk from 'safe' levels of pollution

    New scientific research suggests that the impacts of nitrogen pollution may extend even further than previously thought. Dr Richard Payne and Professor Nancy Dise, of Manchester Metropolitan University, together with colleagues at Lancaster University and the Open University, studied more than 100 individual plant species' reactions to nitrogen deposition at 153 grassland sites across Europe. >> Read the Full Article
  • Grey Water

    There is only so much fresh water in the world of the kind people need to drink to live. Recycled water, or gray water, is water that has been used for household activities such as taking showers or washing dishes. Then there is water that is a bit more dirty such as from the toilet. There are or will be a time and a place where such water will have to be used as is or will be treated so as to reuse once again. Even now in places like Singapore and Namibia, limited supplies of freshwater are being augmented by adding highly treated waste water to their drinking water. >> Read the Full Article
  • Snowmegedan, or Nemo, Whatever you call it, it's a Monster

    The Nor'easter that is pummeling the New England region, and to a somewhat lesser extent, the MidAtlantic region is a massive storm. Nor'easters are not that rare, but one this powerful IS rare. The snowfalls from it are likely setting records in many locations. The National Weather Service does not name winter storms, only Tropical Storms and Hurricanes. So why is every one calling this one Nemo? Look to the Weather Chanel which has started making up names for winter storms. Their idea is to increase awareness of powerful winter storms. It seems to be working! Winter Storm Nemo continues to bring blizzard conditions to much of eastern New England this morning. Blizzard warnings are in effect from coastal Maine to southern New England, including Portland, Maine, Boston, Hartford, and Providence. All travel should be avoided! >> Read the Full Article
  • Climate change could impact wave height, says study

    Average wave size will increase in many parts of the southern hemisphere over the twenty-first century, but decrease in the north, according to an international study on the impact of climate change on oceanic activity. The study, published in Nature Climate Change last month (13 January), predicts a wave height increase of between 20 and 30 centimeters in an area covering at least seven per cent of the surface of the world's oceans. This is due to the poleward intensification of the westerly winds in the southern hemisphere, resulting from climate change. >> Read the Full Article
  • Invasive Striga Weed Serious Problem in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Rising soil temperatures are increasing the spread of a deadly, parasitic weed that significantly reduces crop yields in Sub-Saharan Africa, Striga, according to scientists. The noxious weed, also known as witch-weed, usually thrives in the warm and humid tropics but is now spreading to cooler and wetter highlands as a result of warmer soils driven by global warming and low soil fertility, which provides the right conditions for Striga to thrive. Increasing soil temperatures are fuelling the spread of Striga from the tropics to highland areas The deadly weed can reduce crops by up to 80 per cent, threatening livelihoods Research organisations are trialling various strategies, such as intercropping, to combat its spread This spread has threatened the livelihoods of around 100 million people, with more than four million hectares of maize crops infected. In general, Striga reduces maize and cowpea yields by up to 80 per cent in Sub-Saharan Africa. >> Read the Full Article