• Religious Leaders Unite In Prayer On Climate Change

    Religious leaders united in a silent "prayer for the planet" alongside a retreating Greenland glacier on Friday as part of a widening spiritual drive to combat climate change. "In our small world we all need to struggle together," said Sofie Petersen, the bishop of Greenland, of the meeting of Muslims, Jews, Buddhists and Christians aboard a cruise ship amid icebergs near Illulisat on the west coast. >> Read the Full Article
  • Bodies wash up in Nicaragua from deadly hurricane

    Bodies of Miskito Indians killed by Hurricane Felix floated in the Caribbean off Central America and washed up on beaches on Thursday as the death toll from the storm rose to over 60. Many of the dead were traveling by boat when they were hit by huge waves as Felix struck near the border between Honduras and Nicaragua on Tuesday as a giant Category 5 storm. >> Read the Full Article
  • APEC officials agree on global warming statement

    SYDNEY (AP): Pacific Rim nations on Friday reached agreement on a joint statement on global warming, overcoming bickering between rich and poor nations about whether to include targets on emissions, two Asian officials said. Experts from the 21-member Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation forum approved the wording of a final draft statement on climate change that would be handed to leaders at their summit starting Saturday, the officials said. >> Read the Full Article
  • Carving Out a New Idea of the Past

    There was bad news and good news aboard the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaking vessel Healy during a voyage to the Arctic Ocean. The bad news was a disturbing lack of sea ice, which, combined with strong winds, prevented the vessel from maintaining a steady position in the Arctic's Chukchi Sea. But the good news was that the ice-free seas gave the researchers a rare opportunity to make intricately detailed maps of the region's seafloor. >> Read the Full Article
  • NOAA study backs up predictions of sea ice loss

    Sea ice loss in regions of the Arctic is likely to exceed 40 percent by 2050 compared with the 1980s, according to an analysis of ice computer models by researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. >> Read the Full Article
  • Bush presses Asia-Pacific on trade and climate

    U.S. President George W. Bush urged the Pacific Rim's economic powerhouses on Friday to help secure elusive global deals on trade and climate change and pledged an "unshakeable" commitment to the region's security. >> Read the Full Article
  • Bush shows gift of gaffe at APEC summit

    Even for someone as gaffe-prone as U.S. President George W. Bush, he was in rare form on Friday, confusing APEC with OPEC and transforming Australian troops into Austrians. Bush's tongue started slipping almost as soon as he started talking at a business forum on the eve of an Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Sydney. >> Read the Full Article
  • Typhoon batters Tokyo, moves on

    A typhoon pounded Tokyo and surrounding areas on Friday, killing at least one man and snarling transport and power supplies, before weakening and moving north. The typhoon, the biggest to hit Tokyo since October 2002, brought down record rainfall in many parts of the capital, but by afternoon it had weakened to a tropical storm. >> Read the Full Article
  • Climate talks will test U.S. resolve

    A climate meeting in Washington later this month will show whether the United States is really serious about curbing greenhouse gas emissions after years of playing down the problem, Germany's environment minister said. In an interview with Reuters, Sigmar Gabriel welcomed President George W. Bush's vow at a G8 summit in June to work with the United Nations to fight global warming, but said it was now time for Washington to take firmer steps. >> Read the Full Article
  • Congressional Report: Climate Change Hitting Federal Lands And Waters Hard

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - More beetles and fewer spruce trees in Alaska, whiter coral and fewer scuba-divers in Florida and more wildfires in Arizona already show the impact of climate change on U.S. lands and waters, a congressional watchdog agency reported on Thursday. But the federal agencies that manage over 600 million acres of federal land -- nearly 30 percent of the land area of the United States -- and more than 150,000 square miles of protected waters have little guidance on how to deal with the effects of global warming, the Government Accountability Office said. >> Read the Full Article