• California agency presses EPA on ship exhaust

    LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A Los Angeles-area air quality agency on Thursday petitioned the Environmental Protection Agency to immediately set tougher standards on global-warming pollutants for ocean vessels calling on U.S. ports.

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  • Deep sea probe to track Australia climate change

    Australian and U.S. scientists will send an unmanned submersible 2.5 kms (1.5 miles) deep into the ocean off Australia next week to track climate change by studying coral at unprecedented depths. The joint project will film live and fossilized deep-sea coral off the coast of Australia's southern island state of Tasmania, studying coral growth rings which like tree rings can store centuries of information about the environment. >> Read the Full Article
  • Uncertainties may hurt climate fight

    LONDON (Reuters) - A stronger focus on turbulent financial markets and escalating geopolitical tension in 2008 could prompt governments and companies to neglect less immediate risks such as climate change and food security, the World Economic Forum warned.

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  • Japan feels the heat: global warming pushing temps higher

    The average temperature in Japan could rise by up to 4.7 degrees Celsius (8.5 Fahrenheit) this century unless steps are taken to combat global warming, the Environment Ministry said on Wednesday. Japan, the world's second-biggest economy, could face a rise in the average temperature of 1.3-4.7 C (2.3-8.5 F) in the 2070-2099 period from levels registered in 1961-1990, the ministry said in a report. >> Read the Full Article
  • Powerful storms, tornadoes hit Midwest

    The U.S. Midwest was battered by rain, thunderstorms, and tornadoes late on Monday and early on Tuesday, while the central Plains was spared much of the harsh weather, which was a relief for cattle already stressed by previous storms. The National Weather Service on Tuesday had a tornado watch and severe thunderstorm warnings for parts of southwest Arkansas and flood warnings for much of northern Illinois and northern Indiana. >> Read the Full Article
  • Floods cause havoc in southern Africa

    About 1.5 million Zambians may have to flee their homes because of floods in southern Africa that have cut off vast areas of Zimbabwe and killed six people in Mozambique. Zambian state television showed people carrying beds, chickens and goats above their heads as they moved through surging waters. Half of the country has been put on alert. >> Read the Full Article
  • U.N. climate panel head probably seeking re-election

    India's Rajendra Pachauri said on Monday he will probably seek a new term as head of the U.N. climate panel that shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with former U.S. Vice President Al Gore. "I think we are riding a crest... as far as climate change is concerned, particularly spreading the information of climate change," Pachauri, 67, told Reuters in Oslo after making an evening speech about the risks of global warming. >> Read the Full Article
  • Electric sand findings could lead to better climate models

    ANN ARBOR, Mich.---Wind isn't acting alone in the geological process behind erosion, sand dunes and airborne dust particles called aerosols. The other culprit is electricity. By taking both factors into account, researchers at the University of Michigan have developed a new model that matches real-world measurements of "saltation" better than the decades-old classical theory. Saltation is the process of wind blowing grains of sand across a landscape, sending them bouncing against the ground and each other. The bouncing motion of the saltating grains on the soil bed kicks dust aerosols into the air. >> Read the Full Article
  • As Global Warming Advances, We're "Losing Winter."

    Janisse Ray, an outdoor recreation enthusiast in Danville, Vermont, got so frustrated when the West River hadn't frozen by last January that she donned a wet suit and floated downstream in an inner tube, holding aloft a sign that said “Where’s winter?” >> Read the Full Article
  • Heavy rains flood drought-hit Australian farmers

    Heavy rains and flooding in northeast Australia have been both a blessing and a curse for drought-hit farmers, but more rain is needed to break a seven-year drought. Farm officials say a series of storms have delivered heavy, but sporadic, rain in two of Australia's largest agricultural states, Queensland and New South Wales. >> Read the Full Article