• Major US electric vehicle manufacturing plant announced

    Tyne & Wear, UK - Smith Electric Vehicles, the world's largest manufacturer of road-going electric vans and trucks, is to establish a major production facility in the USA.The factory will have the capacity to produce up to 10,000 zero emission vehicles per year, from 2010. >> Read the Full Article
  • Software grant could speed medicinal regeneration technologies

    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. - Regenerative medicine -- as in re-growing human limbs -- sounds like the basis for a Hollywood action movie. But a research group at Indiana University Bloomington led by biophysicist James Glazier will soon provide the scientific community with a new tool to help bring futuristic medical technologies to real-world laboratories. "The future of medicine is in regeneration," said Glazier, who heads Indiana University's Biocomplexity Institute. "And I expect it to be a reality within the next decade." >> Read the Full Article
  • Intergalactic "Shot in the Dark" Shocks Astronomers

    Pasadena, California - A team of astronomers has discovered a cosmic explosion that seems to have come from the middle of nowhere—thousands of light-years from the nearest galaxy-sized collection of stars, gas, and dust. >> Read the Full Article
  • Canada says no risks from new mad cow case

    OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canada confirmed a new case of mad cow disease on Tuesday, the 11th since 2003, and said the animal in question was a 13-year-old beef cow from Alberta. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency said no part of the animal's carcass had entered the human or animal food supply. The cow was born before Canada introduced a ban in 1997 on cattle feed that contained ingredients made from rendered cattle and other ruminants. Authorities blame suspect feed for most of the previous cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), known as mad cow disease. The CFIA repeated its statement that it expected to find a few cases of BSE over the next 10 years. >> Read the Full Article
  • Boy develops leukemia after gene therapy in UK

    LONDON (Reuters) - A three-year-old "bubble boy" undergoing pioneering gene therapy in London has developed leukemia, marking another setback for the experimental treatment. Doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital said on Tuesday the boy had been successfully treated for SCID-X1, or x-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, often known as "baby in the bubble syndrome," but had developed leukemia two years later. >> Read the Full Article
  • Study links success of invasive Argentine ants to diet shifts

    Biologists at the University of California, San Diego and the University of Illinois at Urbana discovered the opportunistic, changing dietary preferences of California’s Argentine ants—the first time researchers have documented what these invasive ants actually eat—by studying a population of ants for eight years in the foothills southeast of San Diego. An advance copy of their paper is being published online this week in the journal Proceedings of the NationalAcademy of Sciences. >> Read the Full Article
  • WHO probes Pakistan's first bird flu death

    ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - Pakistani authorities and World Health Organization experts were trying to determine on Tuesday whether bird flu had passed from human to human after the country reported its first human death from the virus. Pakistani health officials confirmed at the weekend that eight people had tested positive for the H5N1 bird flu virus in North West Frontier Province since late October, and one of the confirmed cases had died. A brother of the dead man, who had not been tested, also died. It was not yet clear if he was a victim of bird flu. >> Read the Full Article
  • Monkeys and college students as good at mental math

    CHICAGO (Reuters) - Monkeys performed about as well as college students at mental addition, U.S. researchers said on Monday in a finding that suggests nonverbal math skills are not unique to humans. The research from Duke University follows the finding by Japanese researchers earlier this month that young chimpanzees performed better than human adults at a memory game. >> Read the Full Article
  • Growth hormone may relieve fibromyalgia pain

    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Daily injections of growth hormone may help reduce pain and improve the quality of life in some patients with fibromyalgia, new findings of a small study suggest. Fibromyalgia, which causes muscle pain and fatigue, is seen more often in women than in men. Muscle spasm and tightness can often be elicited by depressing certain "trigger points" overlying the muscles. The cause of fibromyalgia is unknown, but stress, poor sleep, injury, infections, and other conditions have been linked to the disorder. >> Read the Full Article
  • Government Mandates Create Opportunities in New Energy Industries

    LITTLE FALLS, N.J. - The global drive toward "clean diesel" and petroleum alternatives continues to accelerate, creating opportunities in the ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) and biofuels industries for certain products and services, according to analysts at Kline, an international consulting and research firm. >> Read the Full Article